Nissan Silvia S14 Japanese ad

December 17th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham

S14 ad featuring Sowing The Seeds of Love

Nissan S14A Silvia comercial

December 17th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham

The usual fare from Japan

Nissan Silvia S14 Japanese ad

December 16th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham
S14 ad featuring Sowing The Seeds of Love

Nissan to bring back the Silvia?

December 14th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham

Nissan Foria fq

There’s growing web-based speculation that Nissan is preparing to compete against Toyota and Subaru’s joint sports coupe with a revived Nissan Silvia.

With multiple carmakers, even Hyundai, getting in on the budget rear-drive action, it’s no surprise that Nissan wants back in as well. With Nissan’s strong Z-car legacy and the global following the Silvia generated, Nissan has as much sports car cred as any Japanese carmaker.

Apparently the Nissan Foria concept (shown above) could offer stylistic inspiration, but  the coupe may only be loosely based on this 2005 Tokyo Motor Show concept.

The rumors say that the reborn Silvia would get a smaller version of the platform that underpins the current 370Z, making a perfect use of existing architecture. This could work out well but may leave the new Silvia a bit heavy.

Created with a smaller powerplant–something like a 1.8-litre turbocharged four-banger the new Silvia would be even more sensitive to excess weight.  But that’s no problem, according to reports the car could weigh in as low as 1,270kg, a total featherweight by today’s standards, with the notable exception of the Mazda MX-5, which may be due out around the same time as the Silvia, and is expected to be even lighter.

Bad news is that it will be about two years until late 2011 or early 2012 to see if the 240SX revival is for real, but be ready for more speculation in the mean time.

Top Ten most stolen cars in NZ

September 18th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham

TOP TEN MOST STOLEN CARS IN NZ

The Automobile Association has just released it’s annual list of the top ten most stolen vehicles in New Zealand. The list draws data from AA Insurance claims in NZ. Subarus were highly prized by thieves with three different models making the top 10 list, the Nissan Skyline, Mazda Lantis and Honda Prelude all featured. Keeping its position at the top of the list is the Nissan Silvia which had the most insurance claims.

Making the list for the first time or returning for 2009 was the Mitsubishi Legnum, Honda Integra, Subaru Forester and the good ole Mazda Familia. One car that has dropped off this year’s list is the only European vehicle to make the 2008 list, the BMW 325i.

According to AAI deputy general manager Martin Fox the list shows that kiwi car thieves prefer pre-2000 models. Fox goes on to say, “That’s probably because older cars lack the sophisticated security systems of newer models, such as electronic locking, alarms and immobilisers, so are simply easier to steal. It’s more about the age of the cars than the various vehicle manufacturers.”

Sixty nine per cent of stolen vehicles reported to AAI did not contain any security devices.

So keep your vehicle alarmed, secure and stay one step ahead of those scumbag thieves.

NZ’s top 10 most stolen cars:

1. Nissan Silvia

2. Subaru Impreza

3. Nissan Skyline

4. Subaru Legacy

5. Mitsubishi Legnum

6. Honda Integra

7. Subaru Forester

8. Mazda Lantis

9. Honda Prelude

10. Mazda Familia

Nissan ceases development of a Silvia successor

February 16th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham

Nissan Foria fq

According to reports, Nissan has suspended plans to create a compact, rear-wheel-drive to replace the Silvia. This is an unfortunate side-effect of Nissan’s financial difficulties and big boss Carlos Ghosn’s pledge to reduce costs.

The first indication that Nissan was working on a Silvia replacement came in the form of the Foria concept (pictured) that debuted at the Tokyo Motor Show in 2005. The Urge design study quickly followed and development of the RWD coupe continued over the following years. Even back in August of 2008 Nissan confirmed that work was still underway, but wouldn’t put an exact date on when it would be unveiled.

Now, big-cheese Ghosn wants the automaker to focus its development efforts on producing sensible small and medium-sized passenger cars, including a Toyota Prius competitor… boring.

A Subaru WRX STI Version 8 Type-RA Spec C by any other name would drive as sweet

July 13th, 2007 by Darren Cottingham

Names of cars can achieve mythical status, and this is why teams of branding people spend millions of dollars ensuring that names like the Nissan Cedric happen as infrequently as possible. But, they do slip through, either as a result of a poor translation or a looming home-time deadline on a Friday afternoon.

Car names evoke emotions, and emotions invoke opening your wallet. So, before you’re suckered in, check out these tricks:

Car names as animals and birds

There will never be a Ford Wombat. No, it must be deadly, like the Shelby Cobra or Dodge Viper; stealthy but swift, like the Ford Puma; elegant and graceful like the Triumph Stag; efficient and ruthless killers like the Ford Falcon or Plymouth Barracuda; or it can be a prey animal as long as it’s in a noble, workmanlike, industrious way, like the Hyundai Pony, Dodge Ram, and Volkswagen Beetle.

Car names as places

Giving a car a desirable place name gives it added credibility, even if the car is bad (that means you, Hyundai Santa Fe and Pontiac/Opel Le Mans). The Americans love naming their cars after places¦usually their own places seeing as the vast majority of them only know about other countries if they’re at war with them. So, the Shelby Daytona Coupe, Pontiac Bonneville, Dodge Dakota and Chevrolet Tahoe all fit the bill.

Car names as mythical creatures

TVR do a good line in dredging up names from Greek mythology — Cerbera and Chimera, for example — but other manufacturers have also dabbled, such as the Renault Clio (Muse of History) and the various incarnations of the Phaeton (son of Helios and the Sun). They’re not making any more mythology, though, so the number of names is limited.

People’s names on cars

This one has a mixed track record. At one end we have the Ferraris (Enzo and Dino), and at the other we have the aforementioned Cedric and the Ford Edsel. Nissan kept the trend alive with the Silvia, and the Serena. It’s probably best to steer clear of names, especially ones like Rupert and Hitler.

Names in other languages

As most of the major car manufacturers are from non-English-speaking countries it’s hardly surprising that many names derive from other languages such as Lupo (wolf), Viva (alive), Astra (stars) and Ignis (fire).

Numbers, series and classes

Probably the safest, and the ultimate cop out, is to use a series of numbers or classes. Mercedes has an enormous range of classes — A-class, B-class, C-class, CLK-class, CLS-class, E-class, GL-class, M-class, R-class, S-class, SL-class and SLK-class, not to mention the AMG-tuned range. BMW has its 1-series, 3-series, 5-series, 6-series, 7-series, M-series, X-series and Z-series, and then there’s the crossover with the Z4M¦confusing! Peugeot has a monopoly on numbers with a zero in the middle, after objecting to Porsche’s use of 901-909 (hence the birth of the 911). But, they did not challenge Ferrari over their 208GT4 and 308GT4, and they would most likely leave 007 alone.

There are also overused letters — GT, RS, R, GTR, L, LX, T, etc. Adding a letter on the end often means you get one or two extra features, but it now seems more sporty or luxurious in your mind.

Names that are ridiculously long

With the plethora of initials and names, we’re presented with names that are so long that by the time you’ve finished reciting them you’ve forgotten how you started. Peugeot’s 206 GTI 180 has nine syllables without the manufacturer’s name, and don’t even go there with Subaru and Mitsubishi’s rally weapons, or anything tuned by a third party like Nismo, Alpina, Rinnspeed, Techart or Brabus.

Invented names

Jackaroo, Korando, Ceed, Impreza, Exige, Hiace, Legnum. Would an infinite number of monkeys on typewriters come up with some of these? Probably not.

Names that should never have been

A Hummer is English slang for flatulence, Pajero is often used in Mexico to mean ‘one who pleasures himself’, and Toyota’s Enima is far too close to enema. But, the popular urban legend around Chevy’s Nova meaning ‘does not go’ in Spanish is not true.

Real words

Discovery, Polo, Legacy, Commodore, Accord, Laser. Well, let’s just thumb through a dictionary until something pops up. There’s always the problem of trademark infringement or accidentally picking a name that has a non-competing undesirable product though, so prep those intellectual property lawyers!

So, you can always modify a real word slightly: Integra, Multipla, Agila, Previa, Octavia. Shove an a on the end of a word, and you’re on your way.

Are all the cool names used?,

Well, if you want to get the .com of your new car name, you’d better be prepared to make up something wacky. The more history we have, the less opportunity there is for cool new names, but the more opportunity there is for resurrecting evocative older names. With global markets naming is more complex than ever, so suddenly those numbers and codes look mighty attractive.

Words Darren Cottingham

Real words

Discovery, Polo, Legacy, Commodore, Accord, Accord, Laser. Well, let’s just thumb through a dictionary until something pops up. There’s always the problem of trademark infringement or accidentally picking a name that has a non-competing undesirable product though, so prep those intellectual property lawyers!

So, you can always modify a real word slightly: Integra, Multipla, Agila, Previa, Octavia. Shove an a on the end of a word, and you’re on your way.

Are all the cool names used?

Well, if you want to get the .com of your new car name, you’d better be prepared to make up something wacky. The more history we have, the less opportunity there is for cool new names, but the more opportunity there is for resurrecting evocative older names. With global markets naming is more complex than ever, so suddenly those numbers and codes look mighty attractive.

Words Darren Cottingham,