Porsche Cayman R revealed – arriving in NZ next year

November 18th, 2010 by Darren Cottingham

Porsche has just pulled the covers off its all-new 2011 Cayman R, the latest variant of the German automaker’s two-seat sports coupe. Unveiled at the LA Auto Show this morning the Cayman uses the letter “R”  which in the Porsche alphabet is reserved exclusively for very special models.

The new, lightweight, mid-engined coupe is designed for spectacular road dynamics and exhilarating driving. This is achieved by reducing weight, increasing engine output and retuning the chassis for an even sportier set-up.

The new Cayman R is 55 kilograms lighter than the Cayman S and gains 8 kW to bring maximum power up to 243 kW from its 3.4-liter six-cylinder boxer engine. With the standard six-speed manual gearbox it will accelerate from 0—100 km/h in just 5.0 seconds. With optional double clutch PDK gearbox the sprint time is reduced to 4.9 secs, or down to 4.7 secs when combined with optional Sport Chrono.

The new mid-engine coupe is capable of a top speed of 282 km/h with manual gearbox, or 280 km/h with PDK. Its fuel consumption is 9.7 L/100 km with six-speed gearbox and 9.3 L/100 km with PDK.

Continue reading “Porsche Cayman R revealed – arriving in NZ next year” »

The Isuzu ute returns to NZ with D-Max range

June 11th, 2010 by Darren Cottingham

The Isuzu pickup is officially back in New Zealand and the new-look workhorse is on sale for Kiwi farmers, tradespeople and weekend warriors.

The new line-up is known as the D-Max range. Included are four double-cab models available nationwide, one 2WD manual and three 4WD in manual and auto transmission. The D-Max is apparently all about toughness and is set to bulid a reputation on strength, reliability and build quality, along with fuel efficiency.

The Isuzu pickup range will be at Fieldays (site G116) where Kiwis can enter a draw to win a Honda TRX680 ATV and prize packs of Swazi Clothing. Isuzu pickups will shortly be at dealerships from Whangarei to Invercargill. Current dealers are listed below.

The importing company and the entire nationwide dealer network are 100 percent New Zealand owned and operated.

“Isuzu is very much a Kiwi story,” explains Greg MacDonald, General Manager. “The brand is well-known here and has a strong reputation on farms and throughout rural districts, and in town among contractors and service trades. Plus of course the double-cab D-Max is a great truck for private owners with a taste for adventure. Like all of these owners, everyone involved with Isuzu pickups nationwide is proud to call New Zealand home.”

Isuzu Pickup Dealers

Auckland Central – Winger Commercial – Isuzu
Waikato – Waikato Motor Group
Tauranga - Tauranga Isuzu
Taupo - Wings and Wheels
Napier and Hastings – Bayswater Vehicles
Palmerston North – McVerry Crawford Motors
Nelson – Bowater Isuzu
Christchurch – Silvester Isuzu

Porsche Cayenne promo video shows off NZ scenery

April 20th, 2010 by Darren Cottingham

Porsche has just released its first 2011 Cayenne promo video showing the latest version of the SUV against some stunning NZ scenery.

The background music is suitably epic and at one point the new Cayenne even drives over Auckland’s harbour bridge.

It’s an awesome video and makes you proud to be a kiwi, the new Porsche Cayenne looks pretty sharp too.

To find out more about the new Porsche Cayenne, read this news item.

Click the link below to watch the video. Continue reading “Porsche Cayenne promo video shows off NZ scenery” »

Auckland’s motorway network gets upgraded in the 1960s

December 20th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham
In the 1950s & 60s, traffic in Auckland city New Zealand became busy enough to warrant the building of a motorway. Interesting that they planned a ring motorway which never eventuated.

In the 1950s & 60s, traffic in Auckland city New Zealand became busy enough to warrant the building of a motorway. Interesting that they planned a ring motorway which never eventuated.

Auckland Harbour Bridge gets its clipons (lane extensions)

December 20th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham
Japanese men show up in Auckland to put extensions on the 4 lane Auckland Harbour Bridge, giving it a total of 8 lanes

Japanese men show up in Auckland to put extensions on the 4 lane Auckland Harbour Bridge, giving it a total of 8 lanes

Auckland Harbour Bridge opening (1959)

December 20th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham
Auckland gets its harbour bridge to unite the North Shore with the rest of the city.

Auckland gets its harbour bridge to unite the North Shore with the rest of the city.

Building the Auckland Harbour Bridge – 50-year celebration

December 20th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham
The sheer logistics of building a bridge across the Waitemata Harbour, the largest project of its time in New Zealand, were always going to be daunting. The excavation required – both underwater for the piers and on land for the approaches – meant that 13,000cu m of earth, mud and spoil had to be shifted. More than 17,000cu m of concrete was poured, and 12,540cu m of road surfacing material found. More than 7000 tonnes of steel were needed for the box girders and superstructure. Deciding on the colour of the bridge was a marathon effort. After 20 months’ deliberation, battleship grey – technically St Enoch’s grey – was chosen because of its heat-reflective properties. Today, it still takes eight years to paint the whole bridge. Even on opening day, May 30, 1959, the numbers were impressive. To feed the 1000 invited guests at the buffet luncheon required 3600 oysters, 25 large hams and 100 crayfish. By the end of that first day, 34,198 vehicles had crossed the bridge – despite breakdowns that caused traffic jams that stretched back to King’s Wharf on the south side and Hall’s Corner in Takapuna in the north.

The sheer logistics of building a bridge across the Waitemata Harbour, the largest project of its time in New Zealand, were always going to be daunting. The excavation required – both underwater for the piers and on land for the approaches – meant that 13,000cu m of earth, mud and spoil had to be shifted. More than 17,000cu m of concrete was poured, and 12,540cu m of road surfacing material found. More than 7000 tonnes of steel were needed for the box girders and superstructure. Deciding on the colour of the bridge was a marathon effort. After 20 months’ deliberation, battleship grey – technically St Enoch’s grey – was chosen because of its heat-reflective properties. Today, it still takes eight years to paint the whole bridge. Even on opening day, May 30, 1959, the numbers were impressive. To feed the 1000 invited guests at the buffet luncheon required 3600 oysters, 25 large hams and 100 crayfish. By the end of that first day, 34,198 vehicles had crossed the bridge – despite breakdowns that caused traffic jams that stretched back to King’s Wharf on the south side and Hall’s Corner in Takapuna in the north.

Stillen Ford GT at Dunlop Targa Rally 2008

December 20th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham
Steve Millen talks about driving the Stillen Ford GT in the 08′ Dunlop Targa Rally. Located in New Zealand, this annual road rally takes place on closed public roads. Drivers race to cover the distance in the shortest period of time

Steve Millen talks about driving the Stillen Ford GT in the 08′ Dunlop Targa Rally. Located in New Zealand, this annual road rally takes place on closed public roads. Drivers race to cover the distance in the shortest period of time

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