Mitsubishi Challenger Exceed 2010 Review

May 21st, 2010 by Darren Cottingham

In the automotive world there are still some tough tasks waiting to be truly mastered. Like making a V8 engine that’s economical, or designing a cheap convertible sports car that isn’t labelled as a hairdressers ride. For Mitsubishi, the new mid-size SUV Challenger represents another difficult venture. Slotting into the range between the Outlander and the Pajero, the Challenger is designed to offer the elusive correct mix of soft roader comfort and cabin feel with fierce off road prowess. Car and SUV got into the all-new Challenger to see if it’s solved this complicated equation.

Visually the Challenger leaves no doubt about its off road aspirations with a chunky, tough look all round. Based on the Mitsubishi Triton’s tough ladder chassis it has a neutral ute-type stance and is tall (1,840mm) with a high ground clearance (220mm). Front-end styling is shared with the Triton but the top spec Challenger Exceed (as tested) receives chrome trim on its Mitsubishi family grille. Chrome and silver touches also feature surrounding the fog lamps, on the door handles and side mirrors, side steps, front scuff plate and17-inch alloys. Elsewhere exterior practicalities include a wide vertical-opening rear hatch, integrated roof rails and rear tinted glass. Overall, the Challenger’s ute underpinning give it the size and elevated stance of a serious off roader, it has a rugged high-waisted appeal that’s modern but not overly rounded or extravagant.

Continue reading “Mitsubishi Challenger Exceed 2010 Review” »

Mitsubishi Challenger is back in the NZ market

January 18th, 2010 by Darren Cottingham
The Challenger nameplate today makes a welcome return to the Mitsubishi Motors stable, promising to build on the popularity it achieved when it was last available in New Zealand.
The all-new 2010 model has made strong advances in on-road comfort and driveability and low-range four-wheel drive ability.
The Challenger has a new high-power 2.5-litre common rail intercooled turbo-diesel engine.  With automatic transmission, five- or seven-seat layouts and two specification levels.
“Previously, owners of Challenger prized it for its four-wheel drive ability, rather than its on-road comfort”, said Mitsubishi’s sales and marketing general manager Peter Wilkins.  “When Mitsubishi’s designers began work on the new model, their clear intent was to offer the best of both worlds — and we think they nailed it. This vehicle, completely new in every aspect, drives like a dream, on-road and off” ¨¨Challenger slots neatly into Mitsubishi’s renowned four-wheel drive range, competitively positioned between the compact crossover Outlander and the all-terrain Pajero.
Style-wise, the Challenger’s basic design premise was to deliver versatility and flexibility, blending tough with smart and muscle with comfort.
One surprise will be the 133kW of power and the 356Nm of torque put out by the Challenger’s 2.5-litre common rail intercooled turbo-diesel enabling it for heavy-duty towing and off-road driving. The engine uses clean diesel technology, with an optimised combustion chamber, improved injector specifications and a variable geometry turbocharger making big contributions to cleaner emissions. In terms of fuel efficiency the Challenger uses 9.8 litres per 100 kms.
Mitsubishi’s Pajero-style All Terrain Technology (MATT), readies Challenger for the hard stuff. Its off-road safe-traction package: Active Stability and Traction Control (ASTC), Multi-mode ABS with EBD, and rear diff lock help out on the slippery stuff.
With its new ladder-frame chassis, Challenger has 50% more torsional rigidity than its predecessor and the Challenger’s RISE body construction and its six airbags bring added safety. Braked towing capacity is 2,500 kg.
Peter Wilkins says that pricing and specifications have been calibrated to offer solid value with the highest possible feature levels. ¨¨”With the option of five or seven seats, the new Challenger will appeal to active families, so we have made sure that all the bells and whistles that mum, dad and a couple of kids need are there, and at an affordable price”. ¨¨The five-seat Challenger GLS, priced at $56,990, boasts a host of functional styling, comfort and technology features.
These include 17 inch alloy wheels (with a full-sized alloy spare), side steps and roof rails.  Inside are steering-wheel mounted controls for cruise and audio, power windows with automatic up and down on the driver’s side, remote keyless entry and central locking, single CD player with six-speaker system, leather-bound steering wheel, an MP3 jack, privacy glass and cargo blind.¨¨The seven-seat Exceed, priced at $61,990, adds third-row seating with a 50/50 split, manually controlled rear air conditioning, and a collection of premium-style features inside and out: to name just a few, leather seat trim, powered driver’s seat, eight-speaker sound, headlamp washers, speed-sensitive wipers and reversing sensors.
The Challenger is covered by the comprehensive Diamond Advantage Warranty, which gives owners a 10-year/160,000 km powertrain warranty, 5-year/130,000 km new car warranty and a 5-year/130,000 km roadside assistance package.
Challenger Pricing
GLS – 5 seat: $56,990
EXCEED – 7 seat: $61,990

Mitsubishi Challenger Exceed 2010

The Challenger nameplate today makes a welcome return to the Mitsubishi Motors stable, promising to build on the popularity it achieved when it was last available in New Zealand.

The all-new 2010 model has made strong advances in on-road comfort and driveability and low-range four-wheel drive ability.

The Challenger has a new high-power 2.5-litre common rail intercooled turbo-diesel engine.  With automatic transmission, five- or seven-seat layouts and two specification levels.

“Previously, owners of Challenger prized it for its four-wheel drive ability, rather than its on-road comfort”, said Mitsubishi’s sales and marketing general manager Peter Wilkins.  “When Mitsubishi’s designers began work on the new model, their clear intent was to offer the best of both worlds — and we think they nailed it. This vehicle, completely new in every aspect, drives like a dream, on-road and off” ¨¨Challenger slots neatly into Mitsubishi’s renowned four-wheel drive range, competitively positioned between the compact crossover Outlander and the all-terrain Pajero.

Style-wise, the Challenger’s basic design premise was to deliver versatility and flexibility, blending tough with smart and muscle with comfort.

One surprise will be the 133kW of power and the 356Nm of torque put out by the Challenger’s 2.5-litre common rail intercooled turbo-diesel enabling it for heavy-duty towing and off-road driving. The engine uses clean diesel technology, with an optimised combustion chamber, improved injector specifications and a variable geometry turbocharger making big contributions to cleaner emissions. In terms of fuel efficiency the Challenger uses 9.8 litres per 100 kms.

Mitsubishi’s Pajero-style All Terrain Technology (MATT), readies Challenger for the hard stuff. Its off-road safe-traction package: Active Stability and Traction Control (ASTC), Multi-mode ABS with EBD, and rear diff lock help out on the slippery stuff.

With its new ladder-frame chassis, Challenger has 50% more torsional rigidity than its predecessor and the Challenger’s RISE body construction and its six airbags bring added safety. Braked towing capacity is 2,500 kg.

Peter Wilkins says that pricing and specifications have been calibrated to offer solid value with the highest possible feature levels. ¨¨”With the option of five or seven seats, the new Challenger will appeal to active families, so we have made sure that all the bells and whistles that mum, dad and a couple of kids need are there, and at an affordable price”. ¨¨The five-seat Challenger GLS, priced at $56,990, boasts a host of functional styling, comfort and technology features.

These include 17 inch alloy wheels (with a full-sized alloy spare), side steps and roof rails.  Inside are steering-wheel mounted controls for cruise and audio, power windows with automatic up and down on the driver’s side, remote keyless entry and central locking, single CD player with six-speaker system, leather-bound steering wheel, an MP3 jack, privacy glass and cargo blind.¨¨The seven-seat Exceed, priced at $61,990, adds third-row seating with a 50/50 split, manually controlled rear air conditioning, and a collection of premium-style features inside and out: to name just a few, leather seat trim, powered driver’s seat, eight-speaker sound, headlamp washers, speed-sensitive wipers and reversing sensors.

The Challenger is covered by the comprehensive Diamond Advantage Warranty, which gives owners a 10-year/160,000 km powertrain warranty, 5-year/130,000 km new car warranty and a 5-year/130,000 km roadside assistance package.

Challenger Pricing

GLS – 5 seat: $56,990

EXCEED – 7 seat: $61,990

Mitsubishi Pajero Exceed (LWB) 2009 Review

March 12th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham

mitsubishi-pajero-fq

Now in its fourth generation the Mitsubishi Pajero has established itself as a true bruiser in the 4WD market. Never afraid to roll around in the mud the Pajero has taken top-honours in the Paris-Dakar Rally an epic eleven times (even though its namesake bears little resemblance to the on-road version). But durability and off-road prowess really isn’t enough anymore in a highly competitive market segment. Four-wheel-drives are now expected to offer refinement, fuel-economy and driving dynamics that can compete with increasingly popular crossover vehicles. The Pajero has been face-lifted for 2009, and is ready to go to work. Is the bullyboy still capable of beating off the competition or does off-road muscle still come at the cost of on-road manners?

A quick walk around reveals that although the classic SUV 2-box design has been retained the Pajero has been rounded and modernised but not at the cost of hardy good-looks. Elements of the Mitsubishi corporate face are reflected in the imposing front end dominated by the chrome slats that extend across the front grille. Bespoke front lights transition well into a raised bonnet.  The Pajero’s side panels are rich with feature lines courtesy of thick body-coloured trim.  With the facelift comes new side steps and mud guards. Wide wheel arches house 18-inch rims cloaked in 265/60R18 rubber. Out the back, Mitsubishi has continued with attaching the spare wheel to the swinging tailgate when many competitors now stow it under the body. The spare makes the tailgate heavier to deal with, but it is well secured and only slightly hinders rear-visibility. Overall the Pajero is a top looking 4WD with styling that reflects an awareness of both Mitsubishi’s current design language and its own model bloodlines.

Shift inside and the sharp design work continues with a dashboard that’s symmetrical and well laid out. Durable dark plastics mix together with chrome-like accents in a combination that’s neither too boring nor too busy. The plastics feel hardy, the centre storage bucket is large and deep, but not all storage compartments are well backed with one unable to hide the wires sitting behind it. The centre control stack has a high digital display that has dated looks but has some tricks to impress friends like a digital compass and an elevation reading, alongside trip computer functions.

The Rockford audio system sounds superb, is MP3 capable, has an in-dash 6-disc stacker, and with a rear-mounted subwoofer it’s easy to announce your arrival. Stereo controls take some getting used to but are repeated with steering wheel audio controls. Upholstery is generally soft and comfortable, but the front seats could benefit from greater lateral support. In the rear lays a third row of part-time seating that is pulled up from the floor – it’s an effort to set it up but has sash-seatbelts and is very useful for smaller passengers or children. The Exceed variant has a DVD player for the rear passengers and automatic lights and wipers added to the equipment list.

The Pajero has some smarts, but when the lunch bell rings and its time to get out into the playground, how does it go? Packed under the bonnet is an upgraded version of the 3.2L Direct Injection Common Rail Turbo Diesel power plant. Power has been kicked up from 127kW to 150kW, with torque boosted to 448Nm from 364Nm. Despite the extra power, fuel economy has also been improved with the Pajero only burning 9.2 litres per 100km combined. Towing capacity is still an impressive 3,300kg, though be aware that with the Pajero’s 3-tonne weight, if you pull anything over 1500kg you’ll need a class 2 license.

During acceleration the performance through the 5-speed automatic transmission was fair if not breathtaking. The engine offers healthy doses of mid-range torque, which are too often followed by turbo-lag before the measure is repeated. This makes the Pajero slightly jerky in its power delivery. That said, it’s still easy to drive and can keep up with general urban traffic.

The biggest disappointment from the Pajero motor isn’t in its performance (which is acceptable) but in its volume. The pre-facelift Pajero received stern criticism for this fault and Mitsubishi is quick to point out that cabin soundproofing had been improved for the 2009 model. Unfortunately it’s still too loud under normal driving conditions, when driving alone the quality stereo can drown it out, but with passengers it can be intrusive to conversations. The excessive noise serves to highlight the tranquillity of a rural destination once the engine is stopped, but it does negate the other areas of comfort that Pajero offers. Ride quality is impressive, on the firm side but generally very car-like with only serious dips and bumps being felt in the cabin. While handling is reasonable for a 3-tonne 4WD, the excellent ride quality promises a level of grip that isn’t quite delivered, and therefore care is required not to arrive at a corner 15-20kph faster than the Pajero is comfortable with.  Active stability control mitigates chassis movement, but some body roll can be felt when changing direction.

Leave tarmac behind, hit the trail and any on-road roughness is traded for total mixed-terrain competence. Mitusbishi’s Super Select system makes the changes offering shifts between 2WD (rear) and 4WD high at speeds up to 100kph. Sitting underneath is one of the most comprehensive 4WD packages on the market with four-wheel independent suspension and a monocoque chassis. The Pajero is equipped with (for the acronym lovers) ABS with Electronic Brakeforce Distribution (EBD), Engine Brake Assist Control (EBAC), Active Stability Control (ASC), Active Traction Control (ATC), Hill Hold Assist and a Rear Diff Lock.

The Pajero has a solid chunky feel, but if things go wrong there’s a bevy of airbags prepared for deployment. Side and front dual-stage driver and passenger airbags are fitted, plus curtain airbags.

One of the main criticisms we had with the previous model (read the review here) was the extremely intrusive traction control. This has been fixed in the current model.

There is no doubt the Pajero is an all round tough-guy in the 4WD market and styling is excellent inside and out. Smoother suspension and a more rigid body has sharpened up handling and definitely improved the ride. But the Pajero still has an old school feel, caused largely by a raucous diesel motor and inadequate soundproofing. For this reason it doesn’t feel as road focused as some of its competitors like the Ford Territory or BMW X5. There is no doubt the Pajero’s an accomplished off-roader and while it is a comfortable and usable daily driver, leaving the tarmac is the only way to really reveal its complete value.

Click through to the next page for a list of specifications

Price: $84,990

What we like:

  • Exterior and interior styling
  • Off-road capability
  • Comfortable ride

What we don’t like:

  • Noisy diesel motor
  • Uneven power delivery
  • Could be even more road-focused

Words and Photos, Adam Mamo

Mitsubishi Pajero Exceed (LWB) (2009) — Specifications

Engine

Displacement – cc 3,200
Bore and stroke – mm 98.5 x 105.0
Compression ratio 16.0:1
Max power (DIN) (kW/rpm) 150 @ 3,800
Max torque (DIN) (Nm/rpm) 448 @ 2,000
Valves 16
Fuel consumption – l/100km 9.2
CO2 – g/km 240

Dimension / weights

Overall length – mm 4,900
Overall width – mm 1,875
Overall height – mm 1,900
Cargo load space 2nd/3rd row flat (litres VDO) 1,758
Cargo load space 3rd row flat (litres VDO) 1,050
Wheel base – mm 2,780
Track front & rear – mm  1,570
Ground clearance – mm  235
Turning circle – m 11.4
Kerb weight – kg 2,345
Gross vehicle weight – kg 3,030
Towing unbraked – kg 750
Towing braked – kg 3,300
Fuel tank size – litres 88
Fuel type diesel
Approach angle – degree 36.6
Departure angle – degree 25.0
Ramp breakover angle – degree 22.5
Battery 95D23L
Alternator 120amp

Transmission

5 Speed automatic with sports mode
Super select 4WD with 2 speed transfer
Final gear ratio 3.917
Rear differential lock

Suspension

Front suspension – double wish bone with coil spring & stabiliser bar
Rear suspension – multi link coil spring with stabiliser bar

Mitsubishi Pajero 3.2DI-D Exceed 2007 Review

March 9th, 2008 by Darren Cottingham

Mitsubishi Pajero Exceed 2007 fq

It was a dune north of Muriwai and five feet in the air the Pajero, lights ablaze, hung there as if it was caught in a tractor beam. Of course, I already knew the Pajero was tough — a few weeks earlier I was in the passenger seat as we came around a corner on an off-road track that should have been taken at about 5kph. ‘Should’ is all very well in hindsight. It was the unnecessary 40kph extra velocity that rocketed us into the air over a foot-high ridge in the track. We landed, bounced slightly sideways, a container of oil we were carrying jumped out of the boot and into the rear seats, while a large toolbox in the rear slammed against a container of brake fluid, bursting it and spraying the inside of the Pajero. At least three wheels were airborne again, and then we came down hard a final time.

The Pajero was fine. My friend who was driving was winded. I couldn’t turn my neck to the right for a few days.

Before I get an irate call from Mitsubishi wondering why I’m trying to send this nice new Pajero to the great junkyard in the sky, I will confess that it was a generation-one Pajero — a 1989 short wheelbase model that belonged to my then business partner, an absolute lunatic when it came to pushing the limit of his cars.

The Pajero has made a name for itself in off-road circles. It is currently the most successful car to compete in the Dakar Rally (previously the Paris-Dakar Rally) having won eleven times (including the last seven straight) since it first entered in 1983. It first won on its third attempt in 1985.

So what all this serves to highlight is that if you have a need for an off-road vehicle that will carry seven people, the long wheelbase Pajero fits the bill nicely. It has all the facilities you would need to get you through some fairly rugged terrain. It will climb a 35-degree slope in first gear and has 225mm of ground clearance. The gearbox has high range two-wheel drive, high range full-time four-wheel drive, four-wheel drive with the centre diff locked, and a low range four-wheel drive with centre diff lock. The ranges can be shifted (with the exception of the low range) up to 100kph. The rear diff can also be locked in extreme conditions.

Our test mud-plugger is the fourth generation top spec long wheelbase Exceed model in Rose Red with a 3.2-litre diesel engine producing 127kW and 364Nm of torque.

Mud can be amply sprayed by burying the throttle to churn the 265/60R18 tyres through the soft stuff, and if you’re on the road the torque is great for boaties and caravan lovers — 3.3 tonnes can be towed, and a further 100kg placed on the roof rack.

Seven people can enjoy the ride — the third row of seats is conveniently hidden in the rear floor. Short people who don’t belong to a gym will find these an effort to lift — not as easy as the Citroen Picasso I had last week. Once the seats are locked into place all that’s required is to insert the comically large head rests (which obscure pretty much all rearward vision). The seat stowage area then becomes a useful hidden storage box due to the absence of a spare wheel (which is carried in a clasp on the rear of the Pajero). Exterior styling is all angles — it could be built from Lego blocks – but inside is where there are plenty of toys to play with.

The Exceed gets the premium 12-speaker Rockford Fosgate audio system with a subwoofer in the boot. This will take six CDs and is MP3-compatible.

A trip computer integrated into the dashboard displays a compass as well as informative graphs from the last four hours, including temperature change, atmospheric pressure, range (kilometres remaining at current average fuel consumption), and elevation.

Reversing sensors, a beautiful full leather interior and steering wheel, power driver’s seat, reclining rear seats, air conditioning vents for all three rows (the second row can also control temperature), and a large sunroof complete the package.

Ultimately the Pajero shows itself to be a good all-round vehicle — rugged enough for the wild stuff, manageable in the city. But it’s really built for people who have a lifestyle property, live in the country, do the odd bit of off-roading to get to their favourite fishing spot, or have a large boat to tow. Its size and manoeuvrability can make it challenging around town — the turning circle is large and the steering ratio has too many turns lock-to-lock. The question remains to be answered whether the more ‘car-like’ driving attitude of vehicles competing in the larger seven-seat SUVs market such as Subaru’s Tribeca force a change in how the Pajero must feel to drive in its fifth generation. Until then it can rightly bask in its enduring off-road reputation.

Price: from $76,990 (diesel Exceed, as tested; $73,990 for petrol V6)

What we like

  • Comfortable seats
  • Leather interior
  • Towing ability
  • Off-road ability

What we don’t like

  • Extremely intrusive traction control (in the end I just left it in 4WD in the wet)
  • Turning circle
  • Steering ratio — too many turns lock-to-lock

Words and photos Darren Cottingham

Model 3.8 V6 GLS 3.8 V6 Exceed 3.2D GLS V3.2D Exceed
GENERAL
Body type – 5 door LWB wagon * * * *
Seating capacity – persons 7 7 7 7
Dual stage air bag (driver, passenger, side, curtain) * * * *
Immobiliser * * * *
Alarm * * * *
ENGINE
3.8-Litre V6 MPI MIVEC * *
3.2-Litre DOHC common rail intercooled turbo diesel * *
EU-STEP 4 * * * *
TRANSMISSION
5 Speed automatic with sports mode * * * *
Super select 4WD with 2 speed transfer * * * *
Diff lock * * * *
SUSPENSION
Front suspension – double wish bone with coil spring & stabiliser bar * * * *
Rear suspension – multi link coil spring with stabiliser bar * * * *
BRAKES
Front – 17″ disc with 4 piston callipers * * * *
Rear 17″ – disc (drum in) * * * *
Park brake – lever type urethane leather urethane leather
4 Wheel ABS with EBD * * * *
Active Stability Control * * * *
STEERING
Steering wheel – 4 spoke urethane * *
Steering wheel – 4 spoke leather with audio controls * *
Cruise control on steering wheel * * * *
GENERAL CHASSIS
Transmission shift knob urethane leather urethane leather
Transfer shift knob urethane leather urethane leather
Wheels – 17″ x 7.5″ Alloy with 265/65R17 112H tyres * *
Wheels – 18″ x 7.5″ Alloy with 265/60R18 110H tyres * *
Spare wheel – same as fitted on vehicle * * * *
Aluminium pedals * *
Electric sunroof – slide & tilt * *
OPERATING HARDWARE
Central locking * * * *
Child proof rear doors * * * *
Keyless entry in key x 2 * * * *
Power windows – front & rear doors * * * *
Door inside handle black silver black silver
Door outside handle black body colour black body colour
GLASS
Laminated windshield glass with sunshade * * * *
Tail gate window glass – tempered with hot wire * * * *
Privacy glass * * * *
SEATS
Trim material fabric leather fabric leather
Driver’s seat – manual height, tilt, slide adjuster * *
Driver’s seat – power height, tilt, slide adjuster with heater * *
Front passenger seat – manual slide, tilt adjuster * *
Front passenger – power slide, tilt adjuster with heater * *
2nd Row seat with fold, recline & armrest with cupholder * * * *
3rd Row seat (removable) with recline & fold away function * * * *
Front seat head rests – normal type * * * *
2nd Row seat head rests X 3 * * * *
3rd Row seat head rest X 2 * * * *
SEAT BELT
Front seat belt – 3 point with ELR X 2, pretensioner & adjustable anchor * * * *
2nd Row seat belt – 3 point with ELR & ALR X 2, 3 point belt with ELR X 1 * * * *
3rd Row seat belt – 3 point with ELR X 2 * * * *
INSTRUMENT PANEL & CONSOLES
Glovebox with key cylinder & lamp * * * *
Floor console * * * *
TRIM PANEL & CARPETS
Front door trim – formed type with armrest & door pocket * * * *
Rear door trim – formed type with armrest * * * *
Door trim material cloth leather cloth leather
Tailgate door pocket with lid * * * *
Tonneau cover * * * *
EXTERIOR ORNAMENTATION
Front bumper – body coloured * * * *
Rear bumper with black protector * *
Rear bumper – body coloured * *
Rear bumper step plate * * * *
Rear deflector * *
CONVENIENCE ITEMS
Assist strap 6 6 6 6
Coat hanger X 2 * * * *
Driver vanity mirror with lid * *
Driver vanity mirror with lamp & lid * *
Passenger vanity mirror with lid * *
Passenger vanity mirror with lamp & lid * *
Door mirror – black, electric control with fold flat * *
Door mirror – colour key, electric control with approach lights & hot wire * *
Side step * *
Foot rest * * * *
Front & rear mud flap * * * *
Roof rail silver silver silver silver
ISO-FIX for rear seat X 2 * * * *
Tether anchor X 3 * * * *
HEATER & AIR CONDITIONING
Air con (full auto) * *
Air con (full auto) & rear air con (manual) * *
Rear heater duct (for 2nd seat) * *
Rear heater duct (for 2nd & 3rd seats) * *
Rear A/C control panel * *
CHASSIS ELECTRICAL
Headlamps halogen discharge halogen discharge
Headlamp levelling device (auto) * *
Side turn lamp on door mirror * *
Front fog lamp * *
Rear fog lamp * * * *
High-mount stop lamp on rear door * * * *
Front room lamp * * * *
Rear room lamp * * * *
Cargo lamp * * * *
Front and rear foot lamp (both sides) * * * *
Rear foot lamp on console * * * *
WIPER & WASHER
Windshield wiper with variable intermittent * * * *
Rear window wiper & washer with intermittent * * * *
Headlamp washer * *
METER & GAUGES
Rheostat * * * *
Analogue speedometer (KM/H) * * * *
Tachometer * * * *
Trip meter * * * *
Door ajar indicator * * * *
Auto position indicator * * * *
4WD indicator * * * *
Cruise control indicator * * * *
Diff lock indicator * * * *
Lighting monitor warning * * * *
Seat belt warning lamp & buzzer (driver only) * * * *
ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES
AM/FM Radio single in dash CD MP3 * *
AM/FM Radio 6-disc in dash CD changer MP3 – Rockford Fosgate * *
Speakers 6 12 6 12
Back warning system * *
Cigar lighter on instrument panel * * * *
Console box accessory socket * * * *
Instrument panel accessory socket * * * *
Engine
displacement – cc 3828 3828 3200 3200
bore and stroke 95.0mm X 90.0mm 95.0mm X 90.0mm 98.5mm X 105.0mm 98.5mm X 105.0mm
compression ratio 9.8:1 9.8:1 17.0:1 17.0:1
max power (DIN) (kW/rpm) 184 @ 6000 184 @ 6000 127 @ 3800 127 @ 3800
max torque (DIN) (Nm/rpm) 329 @ 2750 329 @ 2750 364 @ 2000 364 @ 2000
valves 24 24 16 16
fuel consumption – l/100km 13.5 13.5 10.5 10.5
CO2 – g/km 322 322 278 278
Transmission
Gear ratio 1st 3.789 3.789 3.789 3.789
2nd 2.057 2.057 2.057 2.057
3rd 1.421 1.421 1.421 1.421
4th 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000
5th 0.731 0.731 0.731 0.731
rev 3.865 3.865 3.865 3.865
final 3.917 3.917 3.917 3.917
transfer ratio high 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000
transfer ratio low 1.900 1.900 1.900 1.900
DIMENSIONS / WEIGHTS
overall length – mm 4,900 4,900 4,900 4,900
overall width – mm 1,875 1,875 1,875 1,875
overall height – mm 1,900 1,900 1,900 1,900
cargo load space 2nd/3rd row flat (litres VDO) 1,789 1,758 1,789 1,758
cargo load space 3rd row flat (litres VDO) 1,081 1,050 1,050 1,081
wheel base – mm 2,780 2,780 2,780 2,780
track front – mm 1,570 1,570 1,570 1,570
track rear – mm 1,570 1,570 1,570 1,570
ground clearance – mm 225 225 225 225
turning circle – m 11.4 11.4 11.4 11.4
kerb weight – kg 2,175 2,225 2,260 2,310
gross vehicle weight – kg 2,920 2,920 3,030 3,030
towing unbraked – kg 750 750 750 750
towing braked – kg 3,300 3,300 3,300 3,300
DIMENSIONS
fuel tank size – litres 88 88 88 88
fuel type regular unleaded regular unleaded diesel diesel
departure angle – degree 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
approach angle – degree 36.6 36.6 36.6 36.6
ramp breakover angle – degree 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5
battery 75D23L 75D23L 95D23L 95D23L
alternator 120amp 120amp 120amp 120amp

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