Ferrari reveals future plans for five new models

April 22nd, 2010 by Darren Cottingham

The Fiat group has become a major power in the new car market and is currently undergoing a major restructuring. Reports of the upcoming changes have begun to surface and the most exciting concerns Fiat’s prize asset – Ferrari.

The plan is for Ferrari to get busy and release five new models over the next three years. A new 458 Spider, Ferrari Enzo “special series”, and four other new models are all on the cards. The cars have been announced by Fiat and Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne at a press conference yesterday.

The 458 drop-top and an all-new 612 Scaglietti with a V12 engine are scheduled to enter production next year. Currently referred to as the F151, the 612 Scaglietti may also receive a hybrid powertrain.

Marchionne also announced a “new special series Enzo” would join the all-new 599 GTB Fiorano during 2012. This will be followed up with a major overhaul to the California, to create a California M facelift model. Also due for 2013 is a reworked and more powerful 458 Scuderia.

According to Marchionne both Ferrari and Maserati are looking to make each of their models more distinctive, almost creating sub-brands within the two companies. Maserati is expected to release two new models, placed below the GranTurismo, before 2015.

Out of control Ferrari nearly hits kids

December 20th, 2009 by Darren Cottingham
The Father’s Day Ferrari show in Hartford, Conneticut. One Ferrari loses it on the turn and a father dives to save his kids. The cops aren’t far behind

The Father’s Day Ferrari show in Hartford, Conneticut. One Ferrari loses it on the turn and a father dives to save his kids. The cops aren’t far behind

Ferrari California receives Hamann tuning treatment

September 22nd, 2009 by Darren Cottingham

Hamann Ferrari California rq

Yesterday, it was Edo Competition tuning the hell out of the Ferrari Enzo (read news), today its Hamann Motorsport getting into the new 2010 Ferrari California. Hamann have got their hands on a California and are working on an aftermarket program for the folding hardtop sportscar. Among the performance parts planned is a new exhaust system and a fully reworked engine management program that Hamann says could yield a 20% gain in horsepower from the Ferrari’s 4.3-litre V8 unit.

Until Hamann have it all sorted, California owners can purchase an aerodynamic kit that makes extensive use of carbon fibre. The complete kit consists of a replacement bonnet, front spoiler, side skirts, a three-part rear diffuser, and a small rear wing. Other available components include Hamann’s lightweight forged wheels and an array of interior accessories.

Street-legal Ferrari FXX Evolution

September 21st, 2009 by Darren Cottingham

Edo Competition Ferrari FXX fq

It seems that aftermarket tuner edo competition has run out of supercars to modify. The performance firm has already tweaked almost every mainstream supercar, and have now decided to have a second crack at the Ferrari Enzo. The German tuner’s latest version of the ultimate Prancing Horse is called the FXX Evolution and is in essence a road-going version of the FXX Evoluzione race car offered to Ferrari’s special Corse Clienti program.

So why does this particular Enzo get the coveted FXX name? For starters, 840 horsepower. Displacement of the V12 engine has been pumped up from 6.0 to 6.3-litres, and new camshafts, titanium valve springs and connecting rods, new cylinder heads, and a high-flow exhaust system have all been added to facilitate the 180 horsepower increase. Without mufflers, the FXX Evolution matches its racing counterpart’s 860 horsepower. Edo competition also managed to drop 100 kg from the car’s weight, decrease shift times to 60 milliseconds (also matching the race car), and install an FIA-spec adjustable suspension system. Finally, the exterior gets an adjustable rear wing and a new rear fascia with relocated exhaust tips.

Edo competition is offering a conversion package to all Enzo owners that includes a test day with an instructor, mechanics, data logging, transport and hospitality. The cost of all this hasn’t been announced but it is sure to be suitably ridiculous.

K.O.7 will K.O your bank balance

September 19th, 2008 by Darren Cottingham

Okuyama K.O.7 fq

Ken Okuyama penned the Maserati Quattroporte and the Ferrari Enzo – two of the more desirable cars around today. When he debuted the K.O.7 Spyder at Geneva – reminiscent of the Lotus 340R – we wouldn’t have expected it to enter production.

But Tag-Heuer, which has been involved in the project since it began in 2007, has pre-ordered 24, so Okuyama will create a total of 99. Want one? You’ll have to stump up 19,500,000 Yen, which is the best part of NZ$275,000.

Okuyama has also created an electric supercar concept called the K.O.8, though it was displayed without batteries or powertrain

A Subaru WRX STI Version 8 Type-RA Spec C by any other name would drive as sweet

July 13th, 2007 by Darren Cottingham

Names of cars can achieve mythical status, and this is why teams of branding people spend millions of dollars ensuring that names like the Nissan Cedric happen as infrequently as possible. But, they do slip through, either as a result of a poor translation or a looming home-time deadline on a Friday afternoon.

Car names evoke emotions, and emotions invoke opening your wallet. So, before you’re suckered in, check out these tricks:

Car names as animals and birds

There will never be a Ford Wombat. No, it must be deadly, like the Shelby Cobra or Dodge Viper; stealthy but swift, like the Ford Puma; elegant and graceful like the Triumph Stag; efficient and ruthless killers like the Ford Falcon or Plymouth Barracuda; or it can be a prey animal as long as it’s in a noble, workmanlike, industrious way, like the Hyundai Pony, Dodge Ram, and Volkswagen Beetle.

Car names as places

Giving a car a desirable place name gives it added credibility, even if the car is bad (that means you, Hyundai Santa Fe and Pontiac/Opel Le Mans). The Americans love naming their cars after places¦usually their own places seeing as the vast majority of them only know about other countries if they’re at war with them. So, the Shelby Daytona Coupe, Pontiac Bonneville, Dodge Dakota and Chevrolet Tahoe all fit the bill.

Car names as mythical creatures

TVR do a good line in dredging up names from Greek mythology — Cerbera and Chimera, for example — but other manufacturers have also dabbled, such as the Renault Clio (Muse of History) and the various incarnations of the Phaeton (son of Helios and the Sun). They’re not making any more mythology, though, so the number of names is limited.

People’s names on cars

This one has a mixed track record. At one end we have the Ferraris (Enzo and Dino), and at the other we have the aforementioned Cedric and the Ford Edsel. Nissan kept the trend alive with the Silvia, and the Serena. It’s probably best to steer clear of names, especially ones like Rupert and Hitler.

Names in other languages

As most of the major car manufacturers are from non-English-speaking countries it’s hardly surprising that many names derive from other languages such as Lupo (wolf), Viva (alive), Astra (stars) and Ignis (fire).

Numbers, series and classes

Probably the safest, and the ultimate cop out, is to use a series of numbers or classes. Mercedes has an enormous range of classes — A-class, B-class, C-class, CLK-class, CLS-class, E-class, GL-class, M-class, R-class, S-class, SL-class and SLK-class, not to mention the AMG-tuned range. BMW has its 1-series, 3-series, 5-series, 6-series, 7-series, M-series, X-series and Z-series, and then there’s the crossover with the Z4M¦confusing! Peugeot has a monopoly on numbers with a zero in the middle, after objecting to Porsche’s use of 901-909 (hence the birth of the 911). But, they did not challenge Ferrari over their 208GT4 and 308GT4, and they would most likely leave 007 alone.

There are also overused letters — GT, RS, R, GTR, L, LX, T, etc. Adding a letter on the end often means you get one or two extra features, but it now seems more sporty or luxurious in your mind.

Names that are ridiculously long

With the plethora of initials and names, we’re presented with names that are so long that by the time you’ve finished reciting them you’ve forgotten how you started. Peugeot’s 206 GTI 180 has nine syllables without the manufacturer’s name, and don’t even go there with Subaru and Mitsubishi’s rally weapons, or anything tuned by a third party like Nismo, Alpina, Rinnspeed, Techart or Brabus.

Invented names

Jackaroo, Korando, Ceed, Impreza, Exige, Hiace, Legnum. Would an infinite number of monkeys on typewriters come up with some of these? Probably not.

Names that should never have been

A Hummer is English slang for flatulence, Pajero is often used in Mexico to mean ‘one who pleasures himself’, and Toyota’s Enima is far too close to enema. But, the popular urban legend around Chevy’s Nova meaning ‘does not go’ in Spanish is not true.

Real words

Discovery, Polo, Legacy, Commodore, Accord, Laser. Well, let’s just thumb through a dictionary until something pops up. There’s always the problem of trademark infringement or accidentally picking a name that has a non-competing undesirable product though, so prep those intellectual property lawyers!

So, you can always modify a real word slightly: Integra, Multipla, Agila, Previa, Octavia. Shove an a on the end of a word, and you’re on your way.

Are all the cool names used?,

Well, if you want to get the .com of your new car name, you’d better be prepared to make up something wacky. The more history we have, the less opportunity there is for cool new names, but the more opportunity there is for resurrecting evocative older names. With global markets naming is more complex than ever, so suddenly those numbers and codes look mighty attractive.

Words Darren Cottingham

Real words

Discovery, Polo, Legacy, Commodore, Accord, Accord, Laser. Well, let’s just thumb through a dictionary until something pops up. There’s always the problem of trademark infringement or accidentally picking a name that has a non-competing undesirable product though, so prep those intellectual property lawyers!

So, you can always modify a real word slightly: Integra, Multipla, Agila, Previa, Octavia. Shove an a on the end of a word, and you’re on your way.

Are all the cool names used?

Well, if you want to get the .com of your new car name, you’d better be prepared to make up something wacky. The more history we have, the less opportunity there is for cool new names, but the more opportunity there is for resurrecting evocative older names. With global markets naming is more complex than ever, so suddenly those numbers and codes look mighty attractive.

Words Darren Cottingham,