Brooklands, Weybridge, Surrey, UK

Brooklands, Weybridge, Surrey, UK

Opened on June 17, 1907 it was the first banked motor race circuit in the world and the first ever oval style race track built for cars. Up to a 100 feet wide and 4.3km long (check out this 1938 map) it was built on the site of two farms owned by the instigator Hugh Locke-King. Used extensively up until World War Two, when it was taken over by the military, someone thought it might be a good idea to destroy some of the banking in an attempt to camouflage the facility. Thus ending the circuit’s circuit career.

At its height though, it would regularly accommodate up to 250,000 spectators, and see 24hr races with ‘Gents’ running speeds of up to 230kph  on skinny tires and occasionally getting airborne over the bumps. Finally receiving a preservation order in 2001, the remaining track sections (made entirely of concrete) were given a certain future through the help of Sir Stirling Moss and the Earl of March (see Brooklands Society). The circuit also had close ties with the aviation industry through local industry and the siting of an airfield in the middle.

You simply must visit the track and walk up the members’ banking section. It’s so steep that its real ‘hands and knees’ stuff toward the top.

Visit the Brooklands Museum website

By Phil Clark

Opened on June 17, 1907 it was the first banked motor race circuit in the world and the first ever oval style race track built for cars. Up to a 100 feet wide and 4.3km long (check out this 1938 map) it was built on the site of two farms owned by the instigator Hugh Locke-King. Used extensively up until World War Two, when it was taken over by the military, someone thought it might be a good idea to destroy some of the banking in an attempt to camouflage the facility. Thus ending the circuit’s circuit career.

At its height though, it would regularly accommodate up to 250,000 spectators, and see 24hr races with ‘Gents’ running speeds of up to 230kph  on skinny tires and occasionally getting airborne over the bumps. Finally receiving a preservation order in 2001, the remaining track sections (made entirely of concrete) were given a certain future through the help of Sir Stirling Moss and the Earl of March (see Brooklands Society). The circuit also had close ties with the aviation industry through local industry and the siting of an airfield in the middle.

You simply must visit the track and walk up the members’ banking section. It’s so steep that its real ‘hands and knees’ stuff toward the top.

Visit the Brooklands Museum website

By Phil Clark

« | »

Let us know what you think

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Road Tests

Silver Sponsors

Car and SUV Team

Richard-Edwards-2016Richard Edwards

Managing editor

linkedinphotoDarren Cottingham

Motoring writer

robertbarry-headRobert Barry

Chief reporter

Ian-Ferguson-6Ian Ferguson

Advertising Consultant

debDeborah Baxter

Operations Manager

RSS Latest News from Autotalk

RSS Latest News from Dieseltalk

Read previous post:
Monte Carlo, Principality of Monaco

Hard to make out from an aerial image but this is a challenging 3.3km street circuit dishing up a heady...

Close