VW Golf Mk1 ends production after 25 years

VW Golf Mk1 ends production after 25 years

VW Golf Mk1 fq

In 1974 the original Volkswagen Golf Mk1 arrived as a replacement to the Volkswagen Beetle. The front-wheel-drive hatchback had a transverse-mounted (water-cooled) 1.5-liter four-cylinder good for just 70 horsepower. While the standard Mk1 Golf offered little in the way of performance, the Mk1 “GTI” kicked off the hot-hatch movement with its 90-horsepower 1.8-litre four-cylinder, slick manual transmission, and upgraded suspension.

In 1984, Volkswagen introduced the Golf Mk2. It was bigger, wider, and more expensive than the original and VW were worried some customers may have been turned-off by the upgrades so it chose to continue the Mk1 production and sell it as the low-cost Econo Golf, or CitiGolf.

Over the past 25 years, more than 500,000 units of the Mk1 Golf have rolled out of a South African assembly plant for sale in markets abroad. Different variations have been fitted with a wide range of engine choices (both gasoline and diesel), from 1.1-liters up to 1.8-liters of displacement. Transmissions have included 4- and 5-speed manuals, plus the 3-speed automatic. Missing most of today’s necessary safety equipment time has finally caught up with the CitiGolf this year and the South African plant has now shut its doors for good

VW Golf Mk1 fq

In 1974 the original Volkswagen Golf Mk1 arrived as a replacement to the Volkswagen Beetle. The front-wheel-drive hatchback had a transverse-mounted (water-cooled) 1.5-liter four-cylinder good for just 70 horsepower. While the standard Mk1 Golf offered little in the way of performance, the Mk1 “GTI” kicked off the hot-hatch movement with its 90-horsepower 1.8-litre four-cylinder, slick manual transmission, and upgraded suspension.

In 1984, Volkswagen introduced the Golf Mk2. It was bigger, wider, and more expensive than the original and VW were worried some customers may have been turned-off by the upgrades so it chose to continue the Mk1 production and sell it as the low-cost Econo Golf, or CitiGolf.

Over the past 25 years, more than 500,000 units of the Mk1 Golf have rolled out of a South African assembly plant for sale in markets abroad. Different variations have been fitted with a wide range of engine choices (both gasoline and diesel), from 1.1-liters up to 1.8-liters of displacement. Transmissions have included 4- and 5-speed manuals, plus the 3-speed automatic. Missing most of today’s necessary safety equipment time has finally caught up with the CitiGolf this year and the South African plant has now shut its doors for good

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