UK team develops bonnet-mounted airbag for pedestrian safety

UK team develops bonnet-mounted airbag for pedestrian safety

bonnet airbag

Almost all new cars now come equipped with a full compliment of airbags to keep the driver and passengers safe in the event of an crash. Pedestrian safety has also become very important as carmakers strive to get a high safety rating and stretch out equipment lists so far this has only extended to special pop up bonnets, but that is set to change.

A team in the U.K., led by Roger Hardy of Cranfield University, has developed a new bonnet-mounted airbag system that would theoretically improve the safety of pedestrians that get personal with the windscreen of a car. When not in use, the U-shaped airbag hides away underneath the car’s bonnet at the base of the windshield and won’t restrict the driver’s view.

Just prior to impact, the airbag would deploy to protect the unfortunate pedestrian from making contact with the car’s windscreen or A-pillars. At the same time, the car’s bonnet would rise to provide added crumple room over the engine bay. The team believes its system could be put into production within five years without a substantial increase to new vehicle cost while smashing pedestrian injuries in half.

bonnet airbag

Almost all new cars now come equipped with a full compliment of airbags to keep the driver and passengers safe in the event of an crash. Pedestrian safety has also become very important as carmakers strive to get a high safety rating and stretch out equipment lists so far this has only extended to special pop up bonnets, but that is set to change.

A team in the U.K., led by Roger Hardy of Cranfield University, has developed a new bonnet-mounted airbag system that would theoretically improve the safety of pedestrians that get personal with the windscreen of a car. When not in use, the U-shaped airbag hides away underneath the car’s bonnet at the base of the windshield and won’t restrict the driver’s view.

Just prior to impact, the airbag would deploy to protect the unfortunate pedestrian from making contact with the car’s windscreen or A-pillars. At the same time, the car’s bonnet would rise to provide added crumple room over the engine bay. The team believes its system could be put into production within five years without a substantial increase to new vehicle cost while smashing pedestrian injuries in half.

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