The new Mk VI Golf – best of all time?

The new Mk VI Golf – best of all time?

Volkswagen MkVI fq

Volkswagen is sending a new Golf out into the world and it is touting it as the ‘best of all time’. Bigger than its predecessors the new Golf will take subtle styling cues from the Scirocco and Touareg, and offer new technologies within its class.

Economy is a strong feature with an average fuel consumption of 4.5 litres per 100 kilometers for a 110 PS TDI. Upon request, the Golf can park itself nearly automatically in the city thanks to “Park Assist”, it can maintain an ideal gap on the freeway by distance control (ACC), and at the push of a button it can transform itself from a cruiser to a sports car when the new “DCC Adaptive Chassis Control” system is on board. A new ESP system, with finer response over its control range, further optimized crash properties, seven airbags including knee airbag, the special head restraints (WOKS) that work to counteract whiplash trauma, a “seatbelt detection” feature debuting on the Golf in the rear seating area and daytime running lights — also standard equipment — provide for a maximum level of safety.

The roof section now rests — similar to the new Scirocco — on a prominently contoured shoulder section. The rear too is characterised by a predominance of horizontal lines. The taillights — now very wide — are marked among other things by an unmistakably unique night design. Overall, the new Golf — in the interplay of all of its design characteristics — gives the appearance of a significantly wider, flatter and higher end car. The car’s high value also applies to the newly designed interior. The appearance and layout of materials — as well as details such as brushed chrome accents and round in­struments and steering wheels derived directly from those of the Passat CC.

Making a significant contribution to the pioneering acoustic properties of the Golf are the exceptionally quiet common rail TDI engines being implemented on the Golf for the first time. Two balancer shafts (from 103 kW / 140 PS) also eliminate undesirable vibrations. Plans call for a TDI power range from 66 kW / 90 PS to 125 kW / 170 PS. Right at its market launch Volkswagen will be offering two 2.0 litre TDI engines on the Golf; they deliver 81 kW / 110 PS and 103 kW / 140 PS. Always there: a diesel particulate filter (DPF).
The new TDIs are exceptionally fuel efficient. The 110 PS strong diesel is satisfied with just 4.5 litres of fuel per 100 kilometers (119 g/km CO2). Even the 140-PS version only requires 4.9 litres of diesel (129 g/km CO2). In the launch phase, four variants will define the range of gasoline engines with 59 kW / 80 PS, 75 kW / 102 PS, 90 kW / 122 PS and 118 kW / 160 PS. Starting at 90 kW / 122 PS, TSI engines with supercharging and/or turbocharging are used.

With the exception of the entry-level versions, all gasoline and diesel engines may be paired with Volkswagen’s dual clutch transmission (DSG). Either a 6-speed or 7-speed DSG is used, depending on engine torque. This means that on the Golf the extremely efficient and agile DSG has replaced the classic torque converter automatic.

A New Zealand release date hasn’t been confirmed for the Golf yet, but we’ll bring you news as soon as we know!

Volkswagen MkVI fq

Volkswagen is sending a new Golf out into the world and it is touting it as the ‘best of all time’. Bigger than its predecessors the new Golf will take subtle styling cues from the Scirocco and Touareg, and offer new technologies within its class.

Economy is a strong feature with an average fuel consumption of 4.5 litres per 100 kilometers for a 110 PS TDI. Upon request, the Golf can park itself nearly automatically in the city thanks to “Park Assist”, it can maintain an ideal gap on the freeway by distance control (ACC), and at the push of a button it can transform itself from a cruiser to a sports car when the new “DCC Adaptive Chassis Control” system is on board. A new ESP system, with finer response over its control range, further optimized crash properties, seven airbags including knee airbag, the special head restraints (WOKS) that work to counteract whiplash trauma, a “seatbelt detection” feature debuting on the Golf in the rear seating area and daytime running lights — also standard equipment — provide for a maximum level of safety.

The roof section now rests — similar to the new Scirocco — on a prominently contoured shoulder section. The rear too is characterised by a predominance of horizontal lines. The taillights — now very wide — are marked among other things by an unmistakably unique night design. Overall, the new Golf — in the interplay of all of its design characteristics — gives the appearance of a significantly wider, flatter and higher end car. The car’s high value also applies to the newly designed interior. The appearance and layout of materials — as well as details such as brushed chrome accents and round in­struments and steering wheels derived directly from those of the Passat CC.

Making a significant contribution to the pioneering acoustic properties of the Golf are the exceptionally quiet common rail TDI engines being implemented on the Golf for the first time. Two balancer shafts (from 103 kW / 140 PS) also eliminate undesirable vibrations. Plans call for a TDI power range from 66 kW / 90 PS to 125 kW / 170 PS. Right at its market launch Volkswagen will be offering two 2.0 litre TDI engines on the Golf; they deliver 81 kW / 110 PS and 103 kW / 140 PS. Always there: a diesel particulate filter (DPF).
The new TDIs are exceptionally fuel efficient. The 110 PS strong diesel is satisfied with just 4.5 litres of fuel per 100 kilometers (119 g/km CO2). Even the 140-PS version only requires 4.9 litres of diesel (129 g/km CO2). In the launch phase, four variants will define the range of gasoline engines with 59 kW / 80 PS, 75 kW / 102 PS, 90 kW / 122 PS and 118 kW / 160 PS. Starting at 90 kW / 122 PS, TSI engines with supercharging and/or turbocharging are used.

With the exception of the entry-level versions, all gasoline and diesel engines may be paired with Volkswagen’s dual clutch transmission (DSG). Either a 6-speed or 7-speed DSG is used, depending on engine torque. This means that on the Golf the extremely efficient and agile DSG has replaced the classic torque converter automatic.

A New Zealand release date hasn’t been confirmed for the Golf yet, but we’ll bring you news as soon as we know!

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