Popularity of V8 engines continues to fade

Popularity of V8 engines continues to fade

When it comes to engine popularity in the American new car market much has changed according to a recent survey by Wards Auto. Back in 1969 the V8 engine was at a high point and was fitted to 88 percent of all cars sold. With increased fuel prices and global pressure for lower emission vehicles only 4.9% of all cars sold in America have V8 engines.

Four cylinder engines marched up ten percent to increase market dominance of lower cylinder count powertrains. Nearly 62 percent of cars produced in 2009 carried four bangers, up ten percent in just a year from 2008’s 51.7 percent.

Numbers are up for engines below 3.0 litres in capacity, while displacements smaller than 2.0 litres actually saw a decline for 2009. Four-cylinder engines rated between 2.0 and 2.9 litres are stealing customers away from V6 and V8 units by being less expensive and providing improved performance thanks to direct injection and forced induction. Production numbers for trucks also dropped Stateside in 2009, pushing numbers further in favor of smaller engines.

Whatever the future holds for the V8 engine in terms of new car sales, there will always be garages of car nuts working on getting the most out of the bent-eight.

When it comes to engine popularity in the American new car market much has changed according to a recent survey by Wards Auto. Back in 1969 the V8 engine was at a high point and was fitted to 88 percent of all cars sold. With increased fuel prices and global pressure for lower emission vehicles only 4.9% of all cars sold in America have V8 engines.

Four cylinder engines marched up ten percent to increase market dominance of lower cylinder count powertrains. Nearly 62 percent of cars produced in 2009 carried four bangers, up ten percent in just a year from 2008’s 51.7 percent.

Numbers are up for engines below 3.0 litres in capacity, while displacements smaller than 2.0 litres actually saw a decline for 2009. Four-cylinder engines rated between 2.0 and 2.9 litres are stealing customers away from V6 and V8 units by being less expensive and providing improved performance thanks to direct injection and forced induction. Production numbers for trucks also dropped Stateside in 2009, pushing numbers further in favor of smaller engines.

Whatever the future holds for the V8 engine in terms of new car sales, there will always be garages of car nuts working on getting the most out of the bent-eight.

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