Number of cars in the U.S drops by 4 million

Number of cars in the U.S drops by 4 million

Dans 109


ver in the States 2009 was not a good year for car sales. While that comes as little surprise an interesting side effect of the lowered sales is that the total number of vehicles in the overall U.S. car fleet dropped.
There were 250 million cars in the U.S during 2008, and only 246 million at the end of 2009. The Americans bought fewer cars than usual — there were around 10 million sold in 2009 — but also still got rid of 14 million units.
Lester Brown, president of American organisation the Earth Policy Institute, has been speaking out stating that “America’s century-old love affair with the automobile may be coming to an end.” Part of Brown’s reasoning is that he sees the shrinking U.S. fleet trend continuing through 2020 thanks to market saturation, economic uncertainty and a “declining interest in cars among young people who have grown up in cities,” combined with other factors.
Whats the bottom line? Brown believes the shrinking fleet stateside “will also largely eliminate the need for building new streets and highways, and will set the stage for increased investment in public transit and high-speed intercity rail.” Is Brown on to something, or will a more widely-expected rebound in new car sales due to pent-up demand prove his argument flawed? Only time will tell.

Over in the States 2009 was not a good year for car sales. While that comes as little surprise an interesting side effect of the lowered sales is that the total number of vehicles in the overall U.S. car fleet dropped.

There were 250 million cars in the U.S during 2008, and only 246 million at the end of 2009. The Americans bought fewer cars than usual — there were around 10 million sold in 2009 — but also still got rid of 14 million units.

Lester Brown, president of American organisation the Earth Policy Institute, has been speaking out stating that “America’s century-old love affair with the automobile may be coming to an end.” Part of Brown’s reasoning is that he sees the shrinking U.S. fleet trend continuing through 2020 thanks to market saturation, economic uncertainty and a “declining interest in cars among young people who have grown up in cities,” combined with other factors.

Whats the bottom line? Brown believes the shrinking fleet stateside “will also largely eliminate the need for building new streets and highways, and will set the stage for increased investment in public transit and high-speed intercity rail.” Is Brown on to something, or will a more widely-expected rebound in new car sales due to pent-up demand prove his argument flawed? Only time will tell.

Dans 109


ver in the States 2009 was not a good year for car sales. While that comes as little surprise an interesting side effect of the lowered sales is that the total number of vehicles in the overall U.S. car fleet dropped.
There were 250 million cars in the U.S during 2008, and only 246 million at the end of 2009. The Americans bought fewer cars than usual — there were around 10 million sold in 2009 — but also still got rid of 14 million units.
Lester Brown, president of American organisation the Earth Policy Institute, has been speaking out stating that “America’s century-old love affair with the automobile may be coming to an end.” Part of Brown’s reasoning is that he sees the shrinking U.S. fleet trend continuing through 2020 thanks to market saturation, economic uncertainty and a “declining interest in cars among young people who have grown up in cities,” combined with other factors.
Whats the bottom line? Brown believes the shrinking fleet stateside “will also largely eliminate the need for building new streets and highways, and will set the stage for increased investment in public transit and high-speed intercity rail.” Is Brown on to something, or will a more widely-expected rebound in new car sales due to pent-up demand prove his argument flawed? Only time will tell.

Over in the States 2009 was not a good year for car sales. While that comes as little surprise an interesting side effect of the lowered sales is that the total number of vehicles in the overall U.S. car fleet dropped.

There were 250 million cars in the U.S during 2008, and only 246 million at the end of 2009. The Americans bought fewer cars than usual — there were around 10 million sold in 2009 — but also still got rid of 14 million units.

Lester Brown, president of American organisation the Earth Policy Institute, has been speaking out stating that “America’s century-old love affair with the automobile may be coming to an end.” Part of Brown’s reasoning is that he sees the shrinking U.S. fleet trend continuing through 2020 thanks to market saturation, economic uncertainty and a “declining interest in cars among young people who have grown up in cities,” combined with other factors.

Whats the bottom line? Brown believes the shrinking fleet stateside “will also largely eliminate the need for building new streets and highways, and will set the stage for increased investment in public transit and high-speed intercity rail.” Is Brown on to something, or will a more widely-expected rebound in new car sales due to pent-up demand prove his argument flawed? Only time will tell.

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