New boy racer laws shake up kiwi car enthusiasts

New boy racer laws shake up kiwi car enthusiasts

New boy racer law

Enough is enough is the word from the NZ government with a return to car crushing threats in its ongoing battle against ‘boy racers’. Big cheese John Key, says boy racer behaviour is irritating and dangerous and he wants their cars off New Zealand’s roads.

The prized possession of a street racer could end up a crushed cube of metal under new laws and yesterday Police Minister Judith ‘Crusher’ Collins, decided to earn her nickname.

“Three offences over four years means the car is heading to the crusher. That’s for offences like burnouts and skids. Every new offence will now bring them closer to the crusher,” said Collins.

The government is also making changes to other parts of the law. If you have an unpaid traffic fine, the car can be seized and sold to pay those fines and if you are driving someone else’s car and you commit an offence, you can now be charged.

And cruising the streets will now become illegal, a clause Transport Minister Steven Joyce says will not catch innocent drivers. “You would have to be drawing attention to the power or sound of the engine of the motor vehicle, so I would think it would leave the person who is lost off,” said Joyce.
Do boy racers care?

One young car enthusiast Nick Shanks went on record with One News to state his opposition against the law change.

“To be honest they are only going to be able to crush two or three cars a year. Most people have money owing on their cars or have it in someone else’s name which means it makes it difficult for the government to seize it and destroy it,” said Shanks in an interview yesterday. “There is only so much they can do. They’ve been saying that for what 20 odd years now, ever since our parents were doing this kind of stuff,” says Shanks.

Despite Shanks’ spirited comments the government is getting serious and promising that they will be able to crush the cars and the spirit of the boy racer culture. One piece of legislation will increase the penalties for boy racing, while a second will allow for offenders’ cars to be crushed as a last resort.
The Vehicle Confiscation and Seizure Bill – what can it do:

* Allow vehicles to be seized and destroyed as a new penalty for illegal street racing

* Allow vehicles repeatedly used by people with overdue traffic fines to be seized and sold to pay those fines

* Enable Police and Courts to target illegal street racers who commit offences in another person’s vehicle

The Land Transport Amendment Bill – what can it do:

* Allow local authorities to create bylaws that prevent vehicles repeatedly “cruising” city streets

* Allow the compulsory impoundment of vehicles involved in illegal street racing

* Introduce demerit points for noise offences, licence breaches and registration plate offences. This will ensure repeat offenders will lose their licenses, rather than just accrue fines.

The new laws are vague at this stage but have left many car enthusiasts with unanswered questions. What exactly is cruising? How will excessive noise be measured? Hopefully more will be revealed soon.

New boy racer law

Enough is enough is the word from the NZ government with a return to car crushing threats in its ongoing battle against ‘boy racers’. Big cheese John Key, says boy racer behaviour is irritating and dangerous and he wants their cars off New Zealand’s roads.

The prized possession of a street racer could end up a crushed cube of metal under new laws and yesterday Police Minister Judith ‘Crusher’ Collins, decided to earn her nickname.

“Three offences over four years means the car is heading to the crusher. That’s for offences like burnouts and skids. Every new offence will now bring them closer to the crusher,” said Collins.

The government is also making changes to other parts of the law. If you have an unpaid traffic fine, the car can be seized and sold to pay those fines and if you are driving someone else’s car and you commit an offence, you can now be charged.

And cruising the streets will now become illegal, a clause Transport Minister Steven Joyce says will not catch innocent drivers. “You would have to be drawing attention to the power or sound of the engine of the motor vehicle, so I would think it would leave the person who is lost off,” said Joyce.
Do boy racers care?

One young car enthusiast Nick Shanks went on record with One News to state his opposition against the law change.

“To be honest they are only going to be able to crush two or three cars a year. Most people have money owing on their cars or have it in someone else’s name which means it makes it difficult for the government to seize it and destroy it,” said Shanks in an interview yesterday. “There is only so much they can do. They’ve been saying that for what 20 odd years now, ever since our parents were doing this kind of stuff,” says Shanks.

Despite Shanks’ spirited comments the government is getting serious and promising that they will be able to crush the cars and the spirit of the boy racer culture. One piece of legislation will increase the penalties for boy racing, while a second will allow for offenders’ cars to be crushed as a last resort.
The Vehicle Confiscation and Seizure Bill – what can it do:

* Allow vehicles to be seized and destroyed as a new penalty for illegal street racing

* Allow vehicles repeatedly used by people with overdue traffic fines to be seized and sold to pay those fines

* Enable Police and Courts to target illegal street racers who commit offences in another person’s vehicle

The Land Transport Amendment Bill – what can it do:

* Allow local authorities to create bylaws that prevent vehicles repeatedly “cruising” city streets

* Allow the compulsory impoundment of vehicles involved in illegal street racing

* Introduce demerit points for noise offences, licence breaches and registration plate offences. This will ensure repeat offenders will lose their licenses, rather than just accrue fines.

The new laws are vague at this stage but have left many car enthusiasts with unanswered questions. What exactly is cruising? How will excessive noise be measured? Hopefully more will be revealed soon.

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