Mercedes-Benz trainees create retro/futuristic F-Cell Roadster

Mercedes-Benz trainees create retro/futuristic F-Cell Roadster

Mercedes F-Cell fq

With its bicycle-looking spoked open wheels and roofless cabin, the Mercedes Benz F-Cell Roadster looks brand new and a century old at the same time. Designed by juniors at Mercedes the deliberate combination of old and new symbolises a rebirth of thinking about how to build and power cars.

The F-Cell Roadster is powered by a 1.2kW fuel-cell system. Using drive-by-wire technology and a joystick to control steering, the car is capable of up to 25km/h and has a predicted range of up to 350km. No doubt the car is high-tech, but 25km/h is hardly a usable speed on modern roads.

Aside from the historical design elements, the car includes a set of carbon-fibre bucket seats and a fiberglass front section based on Formula 1 race car bodies.

Altogether, it took over 150 trainees about a year to arrive at the final design of the radical F-Cell Roadster. Every element of the car has been designed from the ground up, including electronics, manufacturing mechanics and even the car’s interior features.

Of course there are no plans to put the car into production, but the technology represents Mercedes’ commitment to backing hydrogen fuel cells as an alternative to more conventionally accepted battery electric vehicles.

Mercedes F-Cell fq

With its bicycle-looking spoked open wheels and roofless cabin, the Mercedes Benz F-Cell Roadster looks brand new and a century old at the same time. Designed by juniors at Mercedes the deliberate combination of old and new symbolises a rebirth of thinking about how to build and power cars.

The F-Cell Roadster is powered by a 1.2kW fuel-cell system. Using drive-by-wire technology and a joystick to control steering, the car is capable of up to 25km/h and has a predicted range of up to 350km. No doubt the car is high-tech, but 25km/h is hardly a usable speed on modern roads.

Aside from the historical design elements, the car includes a set of carbon-fibre bucket seats and a fiberglass front section based on Formula 1 race car bodies.

Altogether, it took over 150 trainees about a year to arrive at the final design of the radical F-Cell Roadster. Every element of the car has been designed from the ground up, including electronics, manufacturing mechanics and even the car’s interior features.

Of course there are no plans to put the car into production, but the technology represents Mercedes’ commitment to backing hydrogen fuel cells as an alternative to more conventionally accepted battery electric vehicles.

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