Holden NZ launches Active Fuel Management technology for all V8s

Holden NZ launches Active Fuel Management technology for all V8s

Holden NZ

Holden New Zealand announced yesterday the official launch of its fuel saving Active Fuel Management (AFM) technology on all of its V8 automatic models.

AFM is now standard on all automatic V8 models in the Commodore, Ute, Sportwagon and Caprice ranges at no additional cost. AFM, or cylinder deactivation, enables an eight cylinder vehicle to automatically operate on four cylinders in certain driving conditions, before restoring full power when engine demands increase. The vehicles include an AFM visual display which indicates when AFM is active. In a combination of town and highway driving, the technology can deliver fuel savings of up to one litre per 100 kilometres, with potential for even better results at constant cruising speeds.

Holden New Zealand Managing Director, Simon Carr says AFM provides drivers with cost savings without sacrificing performance. “AFM is a great example of the improvements that Holden is delivering to improve fuel efficiency for those who require the power and performance of a V8 engine.” The AFM V8s are the first vehicles in New Zealand to come under Holden’s new EcoLine badge which highlights vehicles that use alternative fuel or fuel saving technologies. The Holden EcoLine range offers consumers affordable solutions to tackle rising fuel costs.

AFM Technology Holden’s AFM system is designed to improve fuel efficiency when high output is not required. In certain conditions such as highway driving, AFM automatically closes the intake and exhaust valves in four of the engine’s eight cylinders while ensuring the engine maintains vehicle speed, effectively operating as a four cylinder. The engine’s electronic throttle control is used to increase cylinder pressure in V4 mode so that the engine can preserve the torque which drivers expect from a V8 powertrain. The fuel supply to the deactivated cylinders will resume seamlessly providing all-cylinder operation when the driver needs it for quick acceleration, or for hauling heavy loads.

Holden NZ

Holden New Zealand announced yesterday the official launch of its fuel saving Active Fuel Management (AFM) technology on all of its V8 automatic models.

AFM is now standard on all automatic V8 models in the Commodore, Ute, Sportwagon and Caprice ranges at no additional cost. AFM, or cylinder deactivation, enables an eight cylinder vehicle to automatically operate on four cylinders in certain driving conditions, before restoring full power when engine demands increase. The vehicles include an AFM visual display which indicates when AFM is active. In a combination of town and highway driving, the technology can deliver fuel savings of up to one litre per 100 kilometres, with potential for even better results at constant cruising speeds.

Holden New Zealand Managing Director, Simon Carr says AFM provides drivers with cost savings without sacrificing performance. “AFM is a great example of the improvements that Holden is delivering to improve fuel efficiency for those who require the power and performance of a V8 engine.” The AFM V8s are the first vehicles in New Zealand to come under Holden’s new EcoLine badge which highlights vehicles that use alternative fuel or fuel saving technologies. The Holden EcoLine range offers consumers affordable solutions to tackle rising fuel costs.

AFM Technology Holden’s AFM system is designed to improve fuel efficiency when high output is not required. In certain conditions such as highway driving, AFM automatically closes the intake and exhaust valves in four of the engine’s eight cylinders while ensuring the engine maintains vehicle speed, effectively operating as a four cylinder. The engine’s electronic throttle control is used to increase cylinder pressure in V4 mode so that the engine can preserve the torque which drivers expect from a V8 powertrain. The fuel supply to the deactivated cylinders will resume seamlessly providing all-cylinder operation when the driver needs it for quick acceleration, or for hauling heavy loads.

« | »

Let us know what you think

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Road Tests

Silver Sponsors

Car and SUV Team

Richard-Edwards-2016Richard Edwards

Managing editor

linkedinphotoDarren Cottingham

Motoring writer

robertbarry-headRobert Barry

Chief reporter

Ian-Ferguson-6Ian Ferguson

Advertising Consultant

debDeborah Baxter

Operations Manager

RSS Latest News from Autotalk

RSS Latest News from Dieseltalk

Read previous post:
Driving frugally is easier than eating organically

I've really tried to drive a bit more frugally. It's not because of the price of petrol, it's because I...

Close