Catalytic converter theft on the rise in the UK

Catalytic converter theft on the rise in the UK

cataltic-converter

Criminal gangs across the UK are stealing catalytic converters from vehicles at an increasing rate.  The precious metal content (usually platinum) fetches around £100 (NZ$270) for just a few minutes’ work.  Previously there was no way of identifying one converter from another, so thieves ran a low risk of being charged, even if caught.

Retainagroup, the car security marking and registration systems specialist, is working with Ford to provide a simple yet effective method of permanently marking catalytic converters to give them a unique identity.

Each mark, applied to the casing of the catalytic converter, comprises a logo (the manufacturer’s or Retainagroup’s International Security Register), a unique seven-digit code and a 24-hour telephone number.  Once the mark has been applied, the unique code is recorded with vehicle and owner details on the register and can be verified immediately at any time, day or night, 365 days per year.  The service is free except for the cost of the call and means that thieves stealing a marked and registered converter will put themselves at risk of being apprehended and charged.

Paul Lambotte, Head of Unit for the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) Vehicle Crime Intelligence Service (AVCIS) said: “The theft of catalytic converters has become an increasing problem for vehicle owners. This crime disables the vehicle and has an environmental impact. AVCIS welcomes initiatives, such as catalytic converter marking, that enable the identification of stolen goods that are found in criminals’ possession.”

cataltic-converter

Criminal gangs across the UK are stealing catalytic converters from vehicles at an increasing rate.  The precious metal content (usually platinum) fetches around £100 (NZ$270) for just a few minutes’ work.  Previously there was no way of identifying one converter from another, so thieves ran a low risk of being charged, even if caught.

Retainagroup, the car security marking and registration systems specialist, is working with Ford to provide a simple yet effective method of permanently marking catalytic converters to give them a unique identity.

Each mark, applied to the casing of the catalytic converter, comprises a logo (the manufacturer’s or Retainagroup’s International Security Register), a unique seven-digit code and a 24-hour telephone number.  Once the mark has been applied, the unique code is recorded with vehicle and owner details on the register and can be verified immediately at any time, day or night, 365 days per year.  The service is free except for the cost of the call and means that thieves stealing a marked and registered converter will put themselves at risk of being apprehended and charged.

Paul Lambotte, Head of Unit for the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) Vehicle Crime Intelligence Service (AVCIS) said: “The theft of catalytic converters has become an increasing problem for vehicle owners. This crime disables the vehicle and has an environmental impact. AVCIS welcomes initiatives, such as catalytic converter marking, that enable the identification of stolen goods that are found in criminals’ possession.”

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