BMW pulls covers on new 2011 X3

BMW pulls covers on new 2011 X3

BMW has just officially pulled the covers off its all-new 2011 BMW X3. The first change is a switch to BMW’s next-generation ‘F’ model codes with the new F25 X3 succeeding the outgoing first-generation E83, launched back in 2004.

Visually, the new X3 borrows more design elements from the larger X5 as well as some style from its little brother, the X1. The X5’s wider, tougher stance is nicely repeated, while a number of the X1’s newer styling language also features on the 2011 X3’s body work.

The new X3 is larger than its predecessor in all directions, measuring 12mm taller, 83mm longer, 28mm wider and sitting 12mm higher. Its wheelbase has increased too, measuring 2810mm – up 15mm on the outgoing model. Although dimensions have increased, weight has dropped with the new X3 weighing around 20kg less thanks to the extensive use of aluminium parts.

The new X3’s cabin follows the same brand-wide design language featured in BMW’s other recent models, and features the latest iDrive system and an 8.8 inch display in the centre stack. Interior space is bigger all round, including rear storage which now measures 550 litres with the rear seats up, and 1600 litres with them dropped.

When the new X3 launches internationally later this year, it will be with a variety of engine options including BMW’s new N55 single-turbo 3.0 litre inline-six, producing a thumping 228kW and 400Nm of torque.

BMW says the N55 engine will take the 2011 X3 xDrive35i to 100km/h in just 5.5 seconds, on its way to an electronically-limited top speed of 240km/h. Fuel consumption isn’t bad either and is quoted at 8.8 l/100km.

The xDrive28i isn’t far off ‘fast’ either, making its way to 100km/h in 6.7 seconds, thanks to its 180kW 3.0 litre inline-six.

The xDrive20d should prove popular and is powered by a 2.0 turbo-charged four-cylinder diesel, generating 135kW and 380Nm of torque, paired with a six-speed manual transmission or BMW’s eight-speed automatic. The diesel will reach 100km/h in 8.5 seconds, on its way to a top speed of 210km/h. Fuel consumption is listed at 5.6 l/100km on the combined cycle.

BMW says it will also launch a range of four-cylinder petrol engines next year.

The new X3 also features BMW’s third-generation xDrive all-wheel-drive system, offering improved stability-control and a 40/60 front-rear torque-split that is now controlled by an electronically-actuated multi-plate clutch steplessly varying torque between the axles. The strut-front and multi-link rear suspension arrangement that featured in the updated version of the outgoing X3 is also on board, with basic upgrades including optional Electronic Damping Control.

The EDC system incorporates electronically-variable shocks that stiffen under heavy cornering loads, or as required by the driver through controls in the cabin. Drivers can also use the EDC system to adjust torque-split with the Performance Control functions, switching to a 20/80 front/rear bias in steady-state cornering, while also applying the brake to the inside rear wheel and directing more power to the outside.

Optional in the outgoing model, the new new model gets Servotronic speed-sensitive power-steering as standard.

BMW is expected to reveal pricing and availability for the New Zealand market closer to the new X3’s launch later in 2010. Till then check out some images in the gallery below.

Click here to read a Car and SUV review of the 2010 BMW X1.

BMW has just officially pulled the covers off its all-new 2011 BMW X3. The first change is a switch to BMW’s next-generation ‘F’ model codes with the new F25 X3 succeeding the outgoing first-generation E83, launched back in 2004.

Visually, the new X3 borrows more design elements from the larger X5 as well as some style from its little brother, the X1. The X5’s wider, tougher stance is nicely repeated, while a number of the X1’s newer styling language also features on the 2011 X3’s body work.

The new X3 is larger than its predecessor in all directions, measuring 12mm taller, 83mm longer, 28mm wider and sitting 12mm higher. Its wheelbase has increased too, measuring 2810mm – up 15mm on the outgoing model. Although dimensions have increased, weight has dropped with the new X3 weighing around 20kg less thanks to the extensive use of aluminium parts.

The new X3’s cabin follows the same brand-wide design language featured in BMW’s other recent models, and features the latest iDrive system and an 8.8 inch display in the centre stack. Interior space is bigger all round, including rear storage which now measures 550 litres with the rear seats up, and 1600 litres with them dropped.

When the new X3 launches internationally later this year, it will be with a variety of engine options including BMW’s new N55 single-turbo 3.0 litre inline-six, producing a thumping 228kW and 400Nm of torque.

BMW says the N55 engine will take the 2011 X3 xDrive35i to 100km/h in just 5.5 seconds, on its way to an electronically-limited top speed of 240km/h. Fuel consumption isn’t bad either and is quoted at 8.8 l/100km.

The xDrive28i isn’t far off ‘fast’ either, making its way to 100km/h in 6.7 seconds, thanks to its 180kW 3.0 litre inline-six.

The xDrive20d should prove popular and is powered by a 2.0 turbo-charged four-cylinder diesel, generating 135kW and 380Nm of torque, paired with a six-speed manual transmission or BMW’s eight-speed automatic. The diesel will reach 100km/h in 8.5 seconds, on its way to a top speed of 210km/h. Fuel consumption is listed at 5.6 l/100km on the combined cycle.

BMW says it will also launch a range of four-cylinder petrol engines next year.

The new X3 also features BMW’s third-generation xDrive all-wheel-drive system, offering improved stability-control and a 40/60 front-rear torque-split that is now controlled by an electronically-actuated multi-plate clutch steplessly varying torque between the axles. The strut-front and multi-link rear suspension arrangement that featured in the updated version of the outgoing X3 is also on board, with basic upgrades including optional Electronic Damping Control.

The EDC system incorporates electronically-variable shocks that stiffen under heavy cornering loads, or as required by the driver through controls in the cabin. Drivers can also use the EDC system to adjust torque-split with the Performance Control functions, switching to a 20/80 front/rear bias in steady-state cornering, while also applying the brake to the inside rear wheel and directing more power to the outside.

Optional in the outgoing model, the new new model gets Servotronic speed-sensitive power-steering as standard.

BMW is expected to reveal pricing and availability for the New Zealand market closer to the new X3’s launch later in 2010. Till then check out some images in the gallery below.

Click here to read a Car and SUV review of the 2010 BMW X1.

« | »

Let us know what you think

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Road Tests

Silver Sponsors

Car and SUV Team

Richard-Edwards-2016Richard Edwards

Managing editor

linkedinphotoDarren Cottingham

Motoring writer

robertbarry-headRobert Barry

Chief reporter

Ian-Ferguson-6Ian Ferguson

Advertising Consultant

debDeborah Baxter

Operations Manager

RSS Latest News from Autotalk

RSS Latest News from Dieseltalk

Read previous post:
2011 Nissan Murano gets new look and diesel engine

Earlier this year, Nissan announced plans to introduce a new diesel engine option for the very first time on its...

Close