BMW cuts ribbon on new high-tech Aerodynamic Test Center

BMW cuts ribbon on new high-tech Aerodynamic Test Center

BMW Test centre1

BMW celebrated its Technology Day yesterday, and for the feature event, the carmaker lanched a new Aerodynamic Test Center (ATC), where future Beemers will be made more efficient and more powerful.

The high-tech facility id definitely distinctive from outside, leaving little doubt as to its function from its shape alone. It will blow air at up to 300km/h, but it’s more than just a wind tunnel. It offers some special abilities that BMW hopes to help better vehicle development.

One such feature is the ATC’s ability to simulate and test aerodynamics in a wide variety of real-world driving conditions without having to build an complete, road-capable prototype. This speeds up development time, cuts costs, and helps the engineers get closer to an ideal design before committing anything to sheet metal.

Another benefit of the ATC for BMW is that its size and scale allows for testing of new designs and how they interact with other vehicles on the road, at high speeds.

There are also five rolling tracks installed in the ATC to enable air flow dynamics to account for movement of the car’s wheels and whatever influence an operational engine might have. That enables engineers to evaluate exactly how aerodynamics affect driving dynamics in the lab, where conditions can be controlled, as opposed to on a test track where weather conditions affect.

Alongside the ATC, BMW is also presenting new straight-six turbocharged engines, both gasoline and diesel – to show off their improved efficiency and power ratings.

BMW Test centre1

BMW celebrated its Technology Day yesterday, and for the feature event, the carmaker lanched a new Aerodynamic Test Center (ATC), where future Beemers will be made more efficient and more powerful.

The high-tech facility id definitely distinctive from outside, leaving little doubt as to its function from its shape alone. It will blow air at up to 300km/h, but it’s more than just a wind tunnel. It offers some special abilities that BMW hopes to help better vehicle development.

One such feature is the ATC’s ability to simulate and test aerodynamics in a wide variety of real-world driving conditions without having to build an complete, road-capable prototype. This speeds up development time, cuts costs, and helps the engineers get closer to an ideal design before committing anything to sheet metal.

Another benefit of the ATC for BMW is that its size and scale allows for testing of new designs and how they interact with other vehicles on the road, at high speeds.

There are also five rolling tracks installed in the ATC to enable air flow dynamics to account for movement of the car’s wheels and whatever influence an operational engine might have. That enables engineers to evaluate exactly how aerodynamics affect driving dynamics in the lab, where conditions can be controlled, as opposed to on a test track where weather conditions affect.

Alongside the ATC, BMW is also presenting new straight-six turbocharged engines, both gasoline and diesel – to show off their improved efficiency and power ratings.

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