Aluminum use in cars higher than ever before Aluminum use in cars higher than ever before

Aluminum use in cars higher than ever before Aluminum use in cars higher than ever before

Car makers and vehicle safety legislation has been going head to head for decades. Car companies are desperate to find new ways to lighten cars up, improve handling and efficiency, while safety regulators increase safety regulations and mandatory equipment until things even back out. One element that has kept both parties happy over the last 40 years has been the increasing use of aluminum.

Surprisingly, despite America’s taste for large heavy vehicles, North America leads the world in vehicular aluminum use, about 0.8% ahead of the world average of 7.8%.

By brand, Honda and BMW lead the way in aluminum use, with 154kg of the metal in each car on average. General Motors and Nissan are also among the leaders. Volkswagen and Hyundai are also among the brands steadily increasing their use of the material.

The aluminum element of most cars is found in engine blocks, wheels, suspension components and bonnets. Almost 70% of all cars sold in North America now have aluminum engine blocks, and around 22% have aluminum hoods.

Aluminum use is increasing as well. Current estimates put the increase at about roughly 2kg per year, rising the total amount to a predicted 136kg per vehicle by 2020. That’s roughly 9.4% by weight, given the average 1,447kg curb weight of light vehicles.

Some cars are also beginning to incorporate even lighter materials including composite resins and carbon-fibre derivatives. The battle for lighter efficient and safer cars will rage on.

Car makers and vehicle safety legislation has been going head to head for decades. Car companies are desperate to find new ways to lighten cars up, improve handling and efficiency, while safety regulators increase safety regulations and mandatory equipment until things even back out. One element that has kept both parties happy over the last 40 years has been the increasing use of aluminum.

Surprisingly, despite America’s taste for large heavy vehicles, North America leads the world in vehicular aluminum use, about 0.8% ahead of the world average of 7.8%.

By brand, Honda and BMW lead the way in aluminum use, with 154kg of the metal in each car on average. General Motors and Nissan are also among the leaders. Volkswagen and Hyundai are also among the brands steadily increasing their use of the material.

The aluminum element of most cars is found in engine blocks, wheels, suspension components and bonnets. Almost 70% of all cars sold in North America now have aluminum engine blocks, and around 22% have aluminum hoods.

Aluminum use is increasing as well. Current estimates put the increase at about roughly 2kg per year, rising the total amount to a predicted 136kg per vehicle by 2020. That’s roughly 9.4% by weight, given the average 1,447kg curb weight of light vehicles.

Some cars are also beginning to incorporate even lighter materials including composite resins and carbon-fibre derivatives. The battle for lighter efficient and safer cars will rage on.

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