Why cars are like unripe fruit when you’re hungry

Why cars are like unripe fruit when you’re hungry

When a new car comes onto the market every journalist is champing at the bit wanting to drive it. It’s like we’re all hungry for something new. But the problem with getting a car when it’s fresh off the tree (or boat, in this case) is that it’s unripe.

The worst and best thing that can happen to you is to be the first journalist to drive a car. It’s the worst because when you get a car with just eleven kilometres on the clock it’s sour – everything feels tight, and it’s slow (because you don’t want to rev it too high). Once it’s done the rounds for a month and there’s a few thousand kms on the clock, everything starts to feel much better. It’s like waiting for the fruit to ripen; delayed gratification at its most extreme to make things sweet and juicy.

Of course, sometimes the car distributors will make you wait, in which case you have no choice, but when you’re given the option, it’s a dilemma.

I’ve just picked up the Mitsubishi Lancer VRX. It has 3750km on it, which means some grubby journos have already thrashed it around the countryside. Conversely, when I picked up the facelifted Suzuki Swift Sport a few months ago it had all of eleven kilometres on the clock.

The Suzuki was a great car, even while not run in, so I had to imagine what it would be like with 10,000kms – probably stunning.

I would accept a low kilometer drive in a car with a surplus of horsepower, but for everyday cars, they’re much better when ripe.

When a new car comes onto the market every journalist is champing at the bit wanting to drive it. It’s like we’re all hungry for something new. But the problem with getting a car when it’s fresh off the tree (or boat, in this case) is that it’s unripe.

The worst and best thing that can happen to you is to be the first journalist to drive a car. It’s the worst because when you get a car with just eleven kilometres on the clock it’s sour – everything feels tight, and it’s slow (because you don’t want to rev it too high). Once it’s done the rounds for a month and there’s a few thousand kms on the clock, everything starts to feel much better. It’s like waiting for the fruit to ripen; delayed gratification at its most extreme to make things sweet and juicy.

Of course, sometimes the car distributors will make you wait, in which case you have no choice, but when you’re given the option, it’s a dilemma.

I’ve just picked up the Mitsubishi Lancer VRX. It has 3750km on it, which means some grubby journos have already thrashed it around the countryside. Conversely, when I picked up the facelifted Suzuki Swift Sport a few months ago it had all of eleven kilometres on the clock.

The Suzuki was a great car, even while not run in, so I had to imagine what it would be like with 10,000kms – probably stunning.

I would accept a low kilometer drive in a car with a surplus of horsepower, but for everyday cars, they’re much better when ripe.

« | »

Let us know what you think

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Road Tests

Silver Sponsors

Car and SUV Team

Richard-Edwards-2016Richard Edwards

Managing editor

linkedinphotoDarren Cottingham

Motoring writer

robertbarry-headRobert Barry

Chief reporter

Ian-Ferguson-6Ian Ferguson

Advertising Consultant

debDeborah Baxter

Operations Manager

RSS Latest News from Autotalk

RSS Latest News from Dieseltalk

Read previous post:
Ford BFII Falcon XR8 Ute 2007 Review

It won’t help the fuel consumption, but a block of granite in the back of a Ford Falcon XR8 ute...

Close