Shotgun more dangerous than real guns

Shotgun more dangerous than real guns

A family member of mine owns a shotgun. Sometimes when I’m visiting I go and check it out, it’s metal and wooden form hanging on the wall. I think about the bang it makes, that final booming sound that rabbits and possums hear before they go into the bright light. Yep, it’s one dangerous piece of kit, but for all its power it’s not the most dangerous shotgun around.

The time-honoured tradition of calling shotgun is a far more dangerous practice. I’ve witnessed punch-ups, doors slammed on fingers and plenty of sulking over who gets the coveted passenger seat. Sometimes I wonder if it’s always been like this and if back in the wild west it got this bad. Back then, shotgun meant actually using a shotgun when you rode shotgun to ward of bandits or those unreasonable native Americans who kept trying to protect their land. Perhaps not, maybe back then it wasn’t such a flash position to find yourself in.

In modern NZ, home to plenty of small Japanese hatchbacks, shotgun means a lot to local lads. A common scenario is two or three mates hitting up a few beers then getting a lift from a young lady who owns a 3-door Honda Civic or similar, the backseat is full of girl junk, shotgun is wanted by all but called by one, the others disagree and suddenly you got some serious beef. Wars have started over less. What we really need is a ‘nanny state’ advertising campaign telling young men how to call shotgun fairly. But until we do a website has sprung up named ‘The Official Rules of Shotgun’ and that’s what it’s trying to teach.

A common belief is that Shotgun can be called as soon as the car becomes visible, it isn’t quite that simple according to the official rules. But what is simple are a few common sense rules that are there for everyone’s wellbeing:

1) For trips over an hour the same person can’t call shotgun on both legs of the journey. That just isn’t fair.

2) If the driver’s significant other is riding in the car, they have shotgun automatically unless they choose to give it up.

3) Pregnant woman and the elderly have shotgun, trying to call it over them is just disrespectful clowning.

4) If someone has their hand on the door handle, shotgun can no longer be called and no trying to push them off the passenger door, that’s how trouble kicks off.

5) If shotgun is called by two peeps at the exact same time (it happens) then it should be decided by Paper, Scissors, Rock with universal rules.

That’s just a starting point, most important is to play fair and if you miss out on shotgun, and retaliate by kicking the seat in front you’re a bloody idiot.

Click this link to check out The Official Shotgun Rules website for further information.
shotgun

A family member of mine owns a shotgun. Sometimes when I’m visiting I go and check it out, it’s metal and wooden form hanging on the wall. I think about the bang it makes, that final booming sound that rabbits and possums hear before they go into the bright light. Yep, it’s one dangerous piece of kit, but for all its power it’s not the most dangerous shotgun around.

The time-honoured tradition of calling shotgun is a far more dangerous practice. I’ve witnessed punch-ups, doors slammed on fingers and plenty of sulking over who gets the coveted passenger seat. Sometimes I wonder if it’s always been like this and if back in the wild west it got this bad. Back then, shotgun meant actually using a shotgun when you rode shotgun to ward of bandits or those unreasonable native Americans who kept trying to protect their land. Perhaps not, maybe back then it wasn’t such a flash position to find yourself in.

In modern NZ, home to plenty of small Japanese hatchbacks, shotgun means a lot to local lads. A common scenario is two or three mates hitting up a few beers then getting a lift from a young lady who owns a 3-door Honda Civic or similar, the backseat is full of girl junk, shotgun is wanted by all but called by one, the others disagree and suddenly you got some serious beef. Wars have started over less. What we really need is a ‘nanny state’ advertising campaign telling young men how to call shotgun fairly. But until we do a website has sprung up named ‘The Official Rules of Shotgun’ and that’s what it’s trying to teach.

A common belief is that Shotgun can be called as soon as the car becomes visible, it isn’t quite that simple according to the official rules. But what is simple are a few common sense rules that are there for everyone’s wellbeing:

1) For trips over an hour the same person can’t call shotgun on both legs of the journey. That just isn’t fair.

2) If the driver’s significant other is riding in the car, they have shotgun automatically unless they choose to give it up.

3) Pregnant woman and the elderly have shotgun, trying to call it over them is just disrespectful clowning.

4) If someone has their hand on the door handle, shotgun can no longer be called and no trying to push them off the passenger door, that’s how trouble kicks off.

5) If shotgun is called by two peeps at the exact same time (it happens) then it should be decided by Paper, Scissors, Rock with universal rules.

That’s just a starting point, most important is to play fair and if you miss out on shotgun, and retaliate by kicking the seat in front you’re a bloody idiot.

Click this link to check out The Official Shotgun Rules website for further information.
shotgun

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