Reynard Inverter – what’s it like to drive a bike-engined car

Reynard Inverter – what’s it like to drive a bike-engined car

A few years ago I went to Sydney, Australia and drove a Radical SR3 around Eastern Creek Raceway. Overtaking a Ferrari around the outside of a corner seemed oh so easy. Keeping my head upright after several laps of fairly intimidating g-forces wasn’t. The market for lightweight track day cars with powerful, high-revving bike engines exploded when Radical revealed its clubsport cars back in the day. The SR3 then became the must-have.

I can only say to describe the Radical’s performance as ‘brutal’ is like describing Mugabe as a caring humanist. Firstly the assault on your ears is extreme – I’m certain that Radical’s owners invest in hearing aid manufacturers. Secondly, you can brake later and harder than you’d ever imagine, threatening to detach your retinas. Thirdly, after braking comes acceleration; the kind that could prolapse a weak rectum. An fourthly comes cornering – cornering so grippy it’s like when your dad used to swing you around by your arms.

That’s why they’re successful. Race drivers love the feeling of discomfort when it’s counterbalanced by speed and exhilaration. Radical has many competitors (Westfield, KTM, etc), and now Reynard, at one time the world’s largest racecar manufacturer, has released the Inverter. Presumably it’s a nod to the aerodynamics and the notion that with the right kind of downforce you could drive it upside down.

Upside down or right way up, we’d still like to have a go.

A few years ago I went to Sydney, Australia and drove a Radical SR3 around Eastern Creek Raceway. Overtaking a Ferrari around the outside of a corner seemed oh so easy. Keeping my head upright after several laps of fairly intimidating g-forces wasn’t. The market for lightweight track day cars with powerful, high-revving bike engines exploded when Radical revealed its clubsport cars back in the day. The SR3 then became the must-have.

I can only say to describe the Radical’s performance as ‘brutal’ is like describing Mugabe as a caring humanist. Firstly the assault on your ears is extreme – I’m certain that Radical’s owners invest in hearing aid manufacturers. Secondly, you can brake later and harder than you’d ever imagine, threatening to detach your retinas. Thirdly, after braking comes acceleration; the kind that could prolapse a weak rectum. An fourthly comes cornering – cornering so grippy it’s like when your dad used to swing you around by your arms.

That’s why they’re successful. Race drivers love the feeling of discomfort when it’s counterbalanced by speed and exhilaration. Radical has many competitors (Westfield, KTM, etc), and now Reynard, at one time the world’s largest racecar manufacturer, has released the Inverter. Presumably it’s a nod to the aerodynamics and the notion that with the right kind of downforce you could drive it upside down.

Upside down or right way up, we’d still like to have a go.

« | »

Let us know what you think

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Road Tests

Silver Sponsors

Car and SUV Team

Richard-Edwards-2016Richard Edwards

Managing editor

linkedinphotoDarren Cottingham

Motoring writer

robertbarry-headRobert Barry

Chief reporter

Ian-Ferguson-6Ian Ferguson

Advertising Consultant

debDeborah Baxter

Operations Manager

RSS Latest News from Autotalk

RSS Latest News from Dieseltalk

Read previous post:
Reynard Inverter track day weapon

Track day specials keep the bad dreams away here at Car and SUV, especially if they weigh less than a...

Close