Parking fines add up to 1.3 billion

Parking fines add up to 1.3 billion

Penalty Charge Notices ( PCN) costs in the UK have now topped £1.3 billion which equates to several trillion of our plummeting New Zealand dollar. At least £500 million per year falls to commercial operators.  Operators also spend an estimated £100 million processing and appealing PCNs, bringing the total to at least £600 million.

The Freight Transport Association (FTA) is quite rightly getting its knickers in a twist because that’s a serious amount of wedge (as they say in London), and it all adds to the cost of doing business. The main problems are the four heavily congested zones of ORB (around Oxford Street, Regent Street and Bond Street), Soho/Covent Garden, Holborn, and Tottenham Court Road.  In each of these zones there is a demonstrable need to improve access for commercial operators.  Some areas need new loading bays, others need more flexibility of current loading limits or a better understanding of the rules by drivers and civil enforcement officers alike. So, FTA has commissioned an in-depth study of delivery ‘hotspots’ across London and will produce a clear list of ‘Critical Delivery Zones’ where traffic authorities need to focus their attention and resources.

FTA believes that sorting out access in these areas can help remove many of the PCNs that are unfairly issued to its members where there is no adequate loading available.  As many of the PCNs issued here are successfully challenged, it will also help traffic authorities reduce their own costs.  The benefit to the local economy of reduced PCNs could be as much as £10 million.

It would do our own authorities a world of good to address this situation in our cities while it’s still not an issue. Auckland does not suffer from serious loading bay shortages, and it’s unlikely to get a dire as it is in London, mostly due to Auckland’s relatively recent development. Our current car-unfriendly government will almost certainly be replaced at the next election, so let’s hope the new government sees its way not just to help commercial operators, but also residents and visitors who want to explore our city without fear of getting a ticket.

Penalty Charge Notices ( PCN) costs in the UK have now topped £1.3 billion which equates to several trillion of our plummeting New Zealand dollar. At least £500 million per year falls to commercial operators.  Operators also spend an estimated £100 million processing and appealing PCNs, bringing the total to at least £600 million.

The Freight Transport Association (FTA) is quite rightly getting its knickers in a twist because that’s a serious amount of wedge (as they say in London), and it all adds to the cost of doing business. The main problems are the four heavily congested zones of ORB (around Oxford Street, Regent Street and Bond Street), Soho/Covent Garden, Holborn, and Tottenham Court Road.  In each of these zones there is a demonstrable need to improve access for commercial operators.  Some areas need new loading bays, others need more flexibility of current loading limits or a better understanding of the rules by drivers and civil enforcement officers alike. So, FTA has commissioned an in-depth study of delivery ‘hotspots’ across London and will produce a clear list of ‘Critical Delivery Zones’ where traffic authorities need to focus their attention and resources.

FTA believes that sorting out access in these areas can help remove many of the PCNs that are unfairly issued to its members where there is no adequate loading available.  As many of the PCNs issued here are successfully challenged, it will also help traffic authorities reduce their own costs.  The benefit to the local economy of reduced PCNs could be as much as £10 million.

It would do our own authorities a world of good to address this situation in our cities while it’s still not an issue. Auckland does not suffer from serious loading bay shortages, and it’s unlikely to get a dire as it is in London, mostly due to Auckland’s relatively recent development. Our current car-unfriendly government will almost certainly be replaced at the next election, so let’s hope the new government sees its way not just to help commercial operators, but also residents and visitors who want to explore our city without fear of getting a ticket.

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