Knocking On A Bit

Knocking On A Bit

Because of the anonymity the written word offers, you, the good readers of Car & SUV, are unable to tell that I am typing this with the upper body equivalent of a limp. After four years absence from the real beautiful game, the opportunity to add the title of ‘multi-hemisphere rugby player’ to my laughably weak sporting CV has proved too much of a draw to resist and the old boots have been pulled out for one last hurrah.

And after only two training sessions, I’m beginning to think that this may not have been such a flash idea. For a start, my usual pleasant Saturday afternoon schedule of a gentle walk along one of the North Shore’s many lovely beaches has been replaced by eighty minutes on a muddy park in the company of fifteen burly men from Otahuhu, all of whom will be there with the expressed aim of separating my head from my shoulders. But even more importantly, my return to the rugby arena is proving to be an unpleasant reminder that I’m actually getting on a bit.

Oldies but goodies have no need for the website

A new found inability to a) run fast enough to get away from people and b) absorb the bone crunching impacts that happen as a result of a) is teaching me that while age may well bring experience, it also comes with one or two physical detriments as compensation.

And this is a sentiment that seems to be shared by the New Zealand Transport Agency, which has launched a web site aimed at assisting “Senior Drivers”.

The concept looks promising; in one simple, easy to access location is all the information an aging motorist requires to assess their driving abilities, pick up some helpful tips on prolonging their motoring career and find out about the options available to them when the time comes to hang up the driving gloves for good.

It sounds great, but there is a bit of a problem. The majority of older drivers that I’ve experienced are perfectly competent behind the wheel and have absolutely no need for such a resource. Yes, they do tend to travel a little slower than I would personally choose, but in general they are conscientious, aware and well-mannered road users. The kind of sharp individuals who would keep themselves up to speed with modern trends like, just for example, the internet.

Unfortunately the kind of dot-brained coots who give our most mature motorists a bad rap by choosing inopportune moments to forget exactly which pedal makes the car stop, are unlikely to be so web-savvy. These are probably people far too preoccupied trying to remember if they put their trousers on in the morning to be bothered with such passing fads as the information superhighway and as such the effort to reach them via it will be a bit of a waste. I suspect the money may well have been better spent organising an informative coffee morning, possibly hosted by Winston Peters.

That’s not to say this idea couldn’t be positively applied in other aspects of life. For instance the New Zealand Rugby Union could quite easily provide a website advising senior players on ways of continuing their career even after the repeated impacts of large Samoans. In fact, if they wanted to be really helpful, they could launch it on Sunday.

Because of the anonymity the written word offers, you, the good readers of Car & SUV, are unable to tell that I am typing this with the upper body equivalent of a limp. After four years absence from the real beautiful game, the opportunity to add the title of ‘multi-hemisphere rugby player’ to my laughably weak sporting CV has proved too much of a draw to resist and the old boots have been pulled out for one last hurrah.

And after only two training sessions, I’m beginning to think that this may not have been such a flash idea. For a start, my usual pleasant Saturday afternoon schedule of a gentle walk along one of the North Shore’s many lovely beaches has been replaced by eighty minutes on a muddy park in the company of fifteen burly men from Otahuhu, all of whom will be there with the expressed aim of separating my head from my shoulders. But even more importantly, my return to the rugby arena is proving to be an unpleasant reminder that I’m actually getting on a bit.

Oldies but goodies have no need for the website

A new found inability to a) run fast enough to get away from people and b) absorb the bone crunching impacts that happen as a result of a) is teaching me that while age may well bring experience, it also comes with one or two physical detriments as compensation.

And this is a sentiment that seems to be shared by the New Zealand Transport Agency, which has launched a web site aimed at assisting “Senior Drivers”.

The concept looks promising; in one simple, easy to access location is all the information an aging motorist requires to assess their driving abilities, pick up some helpful tips on prolonging their motoring career and find out about the options available to them when the time comes to hang up the driving gloves for good.

It sounds great, but there is a bit of a problem. The majority of older drivers that I’ve experienced are perfectly competent behind the wheel and have absolutely no need for such a resource. Yes, they do tend to travel a little slower than I would personally choose, but in general they are conscientious, aware and well-mannered road users. The kind of sharp individuals who would keep themselves up to speed with modern trends like, just for example, the internet.

Unfortunately the kind of dot-brained coots who give our most mature motorists a bad rap by choosing inopportune moments to forget exactly which pedal makes the car stop, are unlikely to be so web-savvy. These are probably people far too preoccupied trying to remember if they put their trousers on in the morning to be bothered with such passing fads as the information superhighway and as such the effort to reach them via it will be a bit of a waste. I suspect the money may well have been better spent organising an informative coffee morning, possibly hosted by Winston Peters.

That’s not to say this idea couldn’t be positively applied in other aspects of life. For instance the New Zealand Rugby Union could quite easily provide a website advising senior players on ways of continuing their career even after the repeated impacts of large Samoans. In fact, if they wanted to be really helpful, they could launch it on Sunday.

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