If F1 goes bankrupt, will it really matter?

If F1 goes bankrupt, will it really matter?

The NZ Herald reported today that Max Mosley (you’ll remember him from such films as “Nazi Bondage Session”) has warned that several more F1 teams may pull out of the F1 championship before next year because of the rising costs of running a team. He says that the teams are financially unsustainable and rely on handouts from billionaires to keep them running. If 2 more teams go by the wayside then a grid of 16 cars doesn’t really make for a credible race, and he proposes drastic cuts in spending to ensure the current teams can survive, and perhaps even new teams can join. I agree to a point, but let’s not forget F1’s waning popularity in its traditional markets. Sure, people who are just getting access to TVs (India, China, etc) are watching in awe, but European countries are over it, and America has Indy. F1’s problem is that it is deathly boring. I would rather sandpaper my eyes than sit through a tedium-filled procession of astronomically priced cars circulate around a track the other side of the world. Don’t get me wrong – I used to watch F1 when Mansell, Senna and Prost would duke it out. There was overtaking, excitement, and some ballsy driving. But now it’s all team orders, safety, and eye-watering dullness, so I prefer watching motorbike racing instead (especially when it’s wet). So, I propose that F1 should go back to how it was in the 1960s (albeit with the modern safety measures). This would mean drivers have to tow their car to a race on a trailer using an old Morris Minor, the pit crew can only consist of 4-5 people, and the administration for the team is done by one of the mechanic’s wives. I’ll wager you’ll once again see a rise to the top of the sport by some ingenious Kiwis, used to bootstrapping their racing on the faint whiff of an oily rag.

The NZ Herald reported today that Max Mosley (you’ll remember him from such films as “Nazi Bondage Session”) has warned that several more F1 teams may pull out of the F1 championship before next year because of the rising costs of running a team. He says that the teams are financially unsustainable and rely on handouts from billionaires to keep them running. If 2 more teams go by the wayside then a grid of 16 cars doesn’t really make for a credible race, and he proposes drastic cuts in spending to ensure the current teams can survive, and perhaps even new teams can join. I agree to a point, but let’s not forget F1’s waning popularity in its traditional markets. Sure, people who are just getting access to TVs (India, China, etc) are watching in awe, but European countries are over it, and America has Indy. F1’s problem is that it is deathly boring. I would rather sandpaper my eyes than sit through a tedium-filled procession of astronomically priced cars circulate around a track the other side of the world. Don’t get me wrong – I used to watch F1 when Mansell, Senna and Prost would duke it out. There was overtaking, excitement, and some ballsy driving. But now it’s all team orders, safety, and eye-watering dullness, so I prefer watching motorbike racing instead (especially when it’s wet). So, I propose that F1 should go back to how it was in the 1960s (albeit with the modern safety measures). This would mean drivers have to tow their car to a race on a trailer using an old Morris Minor, the pit crew can only consist of 4-5 people, and the administration for the team is done by one of the mechanic’s wives. I’ll wager you’ll once again see a rise to the top of the sport by some ingenious Kiwis, used to bootstrapping their racing on the faint whiff of an oily rag.

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