I wore out my E

I wore out my E

Last week my E key started playing up. It is the most used key on the computer and its previously textured surface has been worn smooth. It got me thinking about how you can tell what kind of a life a car has had by how the interior has worn. One of the warning signs that a car might have done more kms than its odometer suggests is an excessive level of wear and tear in relation to the indicated kilometres, but it would also depend on the driver’s driving style, weight/size, and the type of driving done.Lots of short trips would add extra wear to the seats as the driver gets in an out. A heavy driver will also exert more wear on the upholstery.
A worn brake pedal would most likely mean lots of stop-start motoring in rush hour (and in a manual, this might apply even more to the clutch pedal). Then there’s the type of wear on the pedals that gives you a style of driving. In my manual car, the right hand side of the pedal is far more worn because I automatically adopt the position for heel-toe braking even in normal traffic (where it’s not really needed).

A worn steering wheel could mean a lot of windy open road driving, or it might be a driver that grips the wheel tightly in both hands. A heavily worn mat might be as a result of a particular type of shoe, lots of kilometres, or someone who fidgets.

Most cars have very durable interiors – ones that will easily last 250,000km – so when looking around at a second hand car with low mileage ask yourself whether you think the amount of wear in the car looks like it matches with the odometer.

Last week my E key started playing up. It is the most used key on the computer and its previously textured surface has been worn smooth. It got me thinking about how you can tell what kind of a life a car has had by how the interior has worn. One of the warning signs that a car might have done more kms than its odometer suggests is an excessive level of wear and tear in relation to the indicated kilometres, but it would also depend on the driver’s driving style, weight/size, and the type of driving done.Lots of short trips would add extra wear to the seats as the driver gets in an out. A heavy driver will also exert more wear on the upholstery.
A worn brake pedal would most likely mean lots of stop-start motoring in rush hour (and in a manual, this might apply even more to the clutch pedal). Then there’s the type of wear on the pedals that gives you a style of driving. In my manual car, the right hand side of the pedal is far more worn because I automatically adopt the position for heel-toe braking even in normal traffic (where it’s not really needed).

A worn steering wheel could mean a lot of windy open road driving, or it might be a driver that grips the wheel tightly in both hands. A heavily worn mat might be as a result of a particular type of shoe, lots of kilometres, or someone who fidgets.

Most cars have very durable interiors – ones that will easily last 250,000km – so when looking around at a second hand car with low mileage ask yourself whether you think the amount of wear in the car looks like it matches with the odometer.

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