Do your car purchasing habits minic your parents’?

Do your car purchasing habits minic your parents’?

(Fellow scribe) Ben and I were talking yesterday about the cars that are in your family holiday photos. He was saying that if you look back through his family’s snaps there’s always a Ford Falcon or Holden Commodore in there. I have personally heard people say that they bought their car because it was the same brand as their Dad used to drive. My family always had one runabout (Mazda 323 or similar), a van (usually a Toyota Hiace) and a powerful car (3 x Rover SD1 3.5V8, 3 x Saab 9000 turbo) – I wouldn’t want to own either of those, but my lust for horsepower is retained, burned into my soul from a young age.

I was too young to appreciate the V8 roar in the Rover, and by the time I was really interested in cars Dad was onto his first Saab. For me, a ride in that when Dad was in a hurry, was a thrill. It made the 0-60mph dash in a shade over 7 seconds, accompanied by lots of torque steer, and at the time that was quick. It was also comfortable. It was a time when the UK police were sensible with their speed policing – if everything was moving at 80-90mph (up to 145kph) on the motorway, they’d just let it flow.

For a while I thought I’d end up buying a Saab, but I found myself in rally-bred Japanese pocket rockets. Ben, on the other hand, has just been reliving his youth with a Ford G6 and HSV GTS. So, if you had good experiences in the cars that your parents had (i.e. if they were cars that were exciting, didn’t break down, etc), then perhaps you’re more likely to be loyal to those marques.

The Holy Grail of brand loyalty is when the kids start buying what the parents drove, but with the thousands of options available nowadays, and people’s urge to be independent, this could possibly be a futile wish by the car manufacturers of the future.

(Fellow scribe) Ben and I were talking yesterday about the cars that are in your family holiday photos. He was saying that if you look back through his family’s snaps there’s always a Ford Falcon or Holden Commodore in there. I have personally heard people say that they bought their car because it was the same brand as their Dad used to drive. My family always had one runabout (Mazda 323 or similar), a van (usually a Toyota Hiace) and a powerful car (3 x Rover SD1 3.5V8, 3 x Saab 9000 turbo) – I wouldn’t want to own either of those, but my lust for horsepower is retained, burned into my soul from a young age.

I was too young to appreciate the V8 roar in the Rover, and by the time I was really interested in cars Dad was onto his first Saab. For me, a ride in that when Dad was in a hurry, was a thrill. It made the 0-60mph dash in a shade over 7 seconds, accompanied by lots of torque steer, and at the time that was quick. It was also comfortable. It was a time when the UK police were sensible with their speed policing – if everything was moving at 80-90mph (up to 145kph) on the motorway, they’d just let it flow.

For a while I thought I’d end up buying a Saab, but I found myself in rally-bred Japanese pocket rockets. Ben, on the other hand, has just been reliving his youth with a Ford G6 and HSV GTS. So, if you had good experiences in the cars that your parents had (i.e. if they were cars that were exciting, didn’t break down, etc), then perhaps you’re more likely to be loyal to those marques.

The Holy Grail of brand loyalty is when the kids start buying what the parents drove, but with the thousands of options available nowadays, and people’s urge to be independent, this could possibly be a futile wish by the car manufacturers of the future.

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