Calling a car ‘Superb’, Skoda, is setting yourself up for a fall

Calling a car ‘Superb’, Skoda, is setting yourself up for a fall

I’m thinking back to the pathetic initial crash test results the Brilliance BS6 got. Basically the car’s crumple zone included the driver’s head. Not good (the Youtube clip is at the bottom of this post). So, we know what BS stands for already, but what’s this about calling a car ‘Brilliance’ – surely that’s setting yourself up for the biggest fall. Like the seven-foot-four giant with the surname ‘Small’, Skoda has gone down the same precarious path with a name that is loaded with all the potential irony you can pack into 6 letters: Superb.

Given Skoda’s extremely dodgy line up of pre-VW-ownership cars, some of you will already have formed your opinion. But, a quick straw poll of my age 30-something friends revealed that some of them would be quite happy to own a Skoda. And those of us in the know realise it’s really a VW that you get for a few grand (or more) cheaper.

$60,000-70,000 buys you a lot of car in many classes. You can have a WRX STI – great car, but it’s been beaten with the ugly stick. Twice. You can have some of the BMW 1-series range…but not the good ones. You can have a top of the line Nissan Maxima with spare change (but I nearly fell asleep telling you). You could even have some of the Peugeot 407 range (including the sedan V6, which is quite good, but full of quirky ‘Frenchness’).

But none of them do what the Skoda does Superbly: carry passengers in extreme comfort with all the legroom required for the aforementioned Mr Small. The last car I drove with this much rear legroom had a grille like the Parthenon, wouldn’t fit in my garage, had horrible polished walnut everywhere, and drank fuel like an Englsh soccer player drinks lager.

As well as being Superb for passengers, the Skoda had a Superb (but moderately costly) level of optional extras such as the TV in the dashboard, which pushed the price up towardsthe $70k range. $70,000! That’s nothing. I’m not going to list the car’s finer details here – that’ll be in the review section soon (click Articles in the menu, then Skoda if you’re reading this after March 2009.)

What the Skoda Superb has achieved is the value of a $100,000 car for somewhere around the $70,000 mark. Plenty of grunt from the diesel engine, excellent interior appointments, and even an umbrella stowed in the rear door.

The problem is, when Skoda makes a better car, what can it possibly be called?

I’m thinking back to the pathetic initial crash test results the Brilliance BS6 got. Basically the car’s crumple zone included the driver’s head. Not good (the Youtube clip is at the bottom of this post). So, we know what BS stands for already, but what’s this about calling a car ‘Brilliance’ – surely that’s setting yourself up for the biggest fall. Like the seven-foot-four giant with the surname ‘Small’, Skoda has gone down the same precarious path with a name that is loaded with all the potential irony you can pack into 6 letters: Superb.

Given Skoda’s extremely dodgy line up of pre-VW-ownership cars, some of you will already have formed your opinion. But, a quick straw poll of my age 30-something friends revealed that some of them would be quite happy to own a Skoda. And those of us in the know realise it’s really a VW that you get for a few grand (or more) cheaper.

$60,000-70,000 buys you a lot of car in many classes. You can have a WRX STI – great car, but it’s been beaten with the ugly stick. Twice. You can have some of the BMW 1-series range…but not the good ones. You can have a top of the line Nissan Maxima with spare change (but I nearly fell asleep telling you). You could even have some of the Peugeot 407 range (including the sedan V6, which is quite good, but full of quirky ‘Frenchness’).

But none of them do what the Skoda does Superbly: carry passengers in extreme comfort with all the legroom required for the aforementioned Mr Small. The last car I drove with this much rear legroom had a grille like the Parthenon, wouldn’t fit in my garage, had horrible polished walnut everywhere, and drank fuel like an Englsh soccer player drinks lager.

As well as being Superb for passengers, the Skoda had a Superb (but moderately costly) level of optional extras such as the TV in the dashboard, which pushed the price up towardsthe $70k range. $70,000! That’s nothing. I’m not going to list the car’s finer details here – that’ll be in the review section soon (click Articles in the menu, then Skoda if you’re reading this after March 2009.)

What the Skoda Superb has achieved is the value of a $100,000 car for somewhere around the $70,000 mark. Plenty of grunt from the diesel engine, excellent interior appointments, and even an umbrella stowed in the rear door.

The problem is, when Skoda makes a better car, what can it possibly be called?

« | »

Let us know what you think

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Road Tests

Silver Sponsors

Car and SUV Team

Richard-Edwards-2016Richard Edwards

Managing editor

linkedinphotoDarren Cottingham

Motoring writer

robertbarry-headRobert Barry

Chief reporter

Ian-Ferguson-6Ian Ferguson

Advertising Consultant

debDeborah Baxter

Operations Manager

RSS Latest News from Autotalk

RSS Latest News from Dieseltalk

Read previous post:
Mitsubishi Lancer VRX Sportback 2009 Review

Fads of celebrity culture are a strange thing. In the nineties Pamela Anderson reached the height of her fame and...

Close