Peugeot 207CC Sport Manual 2008 Review

Peugeot 207CC Sport Manual 2008 Review

Peugeot 207CC 2008 fq

The English buy more convertible cars per capita than the Spanish, which is surprising because the Spanish don’t experience drizzle on the epic, demoralising scale that the British do. The Eskimos have lots of words for snow; the Spanish probably have lots of words for sun. Probably.

So, like an unattractive, lank-haired woman might wear far too much perfume by Chanel when out on the town trying to attract a guy to capture the essence of the sultry European vixen, the British buy convertibles to capture the essence of Spain, where people don’t really buy convertibles.

And that neatly brings me to the Peugeot 207CC hard-top convertible with a peppy 1.6-litre twin-scroll turbo pushing out 150hp and 110Nm of torque. It’s a car that should definitely be driven by sultry European vixens because it is European, cute, and not really a man’s car. I spent the week with the top up trying to look like it was my girlfriend’s car. The thought crossed my mind I should have kept the beard I grew over Christmas and perhaps got some tats to reinforce my maleness, but my beard is ginger and that’s not good for asserting manliness.

Of course I told people I left the top up because I would be subjected to the rigours of the New Zealand sun and with my Anglo-Saxon complexion (don’t call it ginger) that would mean sunburn after just 10 minutes. That is partly true, because I totally understand where the Spanish come from. When it’s 27 degrees and your forehead is hot enough to cook paella on all you want is air conditioning and lots of it.

The 207CC does air conditioning, though not as well as many other cars, which is perhaps because Peugeot expects you to have the steel folding roof down — a procedure that takes around 25 seconds of holding a button down. This digital climate control air conditioning extends to the glovebox and contains a combined active carbon/pollen filter, which obviously doesn’t work if you have the top down.

Safety is good for a small convertible. The 207CC achieves a 4-star Euro NCAP rating from its four airbags (driver, passenger and front side airbags), ABS braking with EBFD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution) and EBA (Emergency Brake Assist).

Handling consists of very predictable understeer when pushed hard; when driven normally the light clutch and steering make around-town manoeuvring simple. The 207CC is short, too, so it fits in small gaps for parking (though it’s best to get the optional reversing sensors.) Further adding to the 207CC’s city-friendliness, the mirrors fold in automatically when the engine is turned off.

Technically the 207CC is a four seater, but I could not sit in the back seat even with the front one all the way forward. It would be for short parents with very young children only. It may have been a better option for Peugeot to forego the back seats completely and make an enormous boot, but you can use the back seat area for storage.

Storage generally in the front is minimal — the glove box is small and there’s no other lockable storage.

The driving position is better than some small Peugeots. It’s still not quite set up for a person who is tall, but not as bad as the 206GTI180 I owned. You’re presented with white-faced dials and a satisfying leather steering wheel. Cruise control and stereo controls are situated on the steering wheel and progress can be made along the roads of the nation in relative comfort.

A naturally aspirated 1.6-litre version is available with Porsche’s Tiptronic gearbox and saves you two grand. The turbo comes with a 5-speed manual.

Overall, this is a car with a distinctly feminine image. Its benign handling makes it easy to drive. For the fashion conscious woman the 207CC imparts an air of European sophistication and a serious sunburn if you’re not careful.

Price: from $43,990 (Sport Manual turbo), or $41,990 (naturally aspirated automatic)

What we like

  • Good power for around town, and overtaking
  • Easy to drive (clutch and steering are light)
  • Boot is large when the top isn’t down
  • $5k cheaper than an MX-5

What we don’t like

  • Boot lid seems flimsy
  • Dead pedal spacing designed for small shoes
  • It’s a 3-seater at best unless all passengers are under 5’2″
  • When the rear windows are open the seat belts vibrate

Words and photos Darren Cottingham

207CC  Sport Manual

Engine

1.6 litre, 16 valve, turbo, 4 cylinder petrol engine

Cubic capacity (cc) 1598

Max power kW (HP) @ rpm 110 (150) @ 5800

Max torque (Nm @ rpm) 240 @ 1400

Emission control Catalytic converter

Emission standard E URO 4

Emission of CO2 by weight 171

Wheels and Tyres

Size 205/45 R17, Alloy

Brakes

Front ventilated with sliding callipers

Rear solid discs with sliding callipers

Suspension

Front Independent McPherson type, helical springs and hydraulic dampers, set to operating pressure of 5 bars

Rear Rear Torsion beam, helical springs and hydraulic dampers set to an operating pressure of 5 bars

Dimensions

Length (mm) 4037

Width (mm) with mirrors 1818

Height (mm) 1397

Weights an d Capacities

Kerb weight (kg) 1493

Braked trailer towing weight (kg) 1070

Unbraked trailer towing weight (kg) 600

Fuel Consumption

City Cycle l/100km 9.6

Highway cycle l/100km 5.8

Combined l/100km 7.2

Safety Features

4 star Euro ENCAP rating

4 airbags – driver, passenger and front side airbags

ABS (with EBFD & EBA)

Electronic Stability Program (ESP) (with ASR & CDS)

2 x Rear 3-point seatbelts with pretensioning and load limiting front seatbelts

Load limiting rear seatbelts

Height adjustable front seatbelts and front seatbelt unfastened warning

Isofix on front passenger seat (child safety seat fixing points)

Fuel cut off inertia switch

Active rear rollover bars

Security

Remote central locking

Alarm and deadlocking (optional)

Rolling code transponder immobiliser

Visible VIN number

Security coded in-car entertainment

Lockable glove box

Auto-lock doors/boot over 10 km (selectable)

Comfort and Convenience

Cruise control with speed limiter

Rear park aid (optional)

Internal operated central door locking

One-touch electric windows with anti-pinch front and rear windows

Electrically operated door mirrors & electric folding mirrors

Atmosphere perfumer (optional)

Style sport pack

Radio/CD Player, MP3 compatible

Steering wheel-mounted remote controls

5-Disc CD Changer in centre console (optional) with 6 speakers

Bluetooth (optional)

Digital climate control air conditioning with air conditioned glovebox

Combined active carbon/pollen filter

Leather steering wheel

Front storage bins

Boot net

12V Row 1

Athermic & acoustic windscreen

Auto and directional headlights

Front and rear fog lights & reverse lights

Steel folding roof

Electrochrome rear view mirror

Peugeot 207CC 2008 fq

The English buy more convertible cars per capita than the Spanish, which is surprising because the Spanish don’t experience drizzle on the epic, demoralising scale that the British do. The Eskimos have lots of words for snow; the Spanish probably have lots of words for sun. Probably.

So, like an unattractive, lank-haired woman might wear far too much perfume by Chanel when out on the town trying to attract a guy to capture the essence of the sultry European vixen, the British buy convertibles to capture the essence of Spain, where people don’t really buy convertibles.

And that neatly brings me to the Peugeot 207CC hard-top convertible with a peppy 1.6-litre twin-scroll turbo pushing out 150hp and 110Nm of torque. It’s a car that should definitely be driven by sultry European vixens because it is European, cute, and not really a man’s car. I spent the week with the top up trying to look like it was my girlfriend’s car. The thought crossed my mind I should have kept the beard I grew over Christmas and perhaps got some tats to reinforce my maleness, but my beard is ginger and that’s not good for asserting manliness.

Of course I told people I left the top up because I would be subjected to the rigours of the New Zealand sun and with my Anglo-Saxon complexion (don’t call it ginger) that would mean sunburn after just 10 minutes. That is partly true, because I totally understand where the Spanish come from. When it’s 27 degrees and your forehead is hot enough to cook paella on all you want is air conditioning and lots of it.

The 207CC does air conditioning, though not as well as many other cars, which is perhaps because Peugeot expects you to have the steel folding roof down — a procedure that takes around 25 seconds of holding a button down. This digital climate control air conditioning extends to the glovebox and contains a combined active carbon/pollen filter, which obviously doesn’t work if you have the top down.

Safety is good for a small convertible. The 207CC achieves a 4-star Euro NCAP rating from its four airbags (driver, passenger and front side airbags), ABS braking with EBFD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution) and EBA (Emergency Brake Assist).

Handling consists of very predictable understeer when pushed hard; when driven normally the light clutch and steering make around-town manoeuvring simple. The 207CC is short, too, so it fits in small gaps for parking (though it’s best to get the optional reversing sensors.) Further adding to the 207CC’s city-friendliness, the mirrors fold in automatically when the engine is turned off.

Technically the 207CC is a four seater, but I could not sit in the back seat even with the front one all the way forward. It would be for short parents with very young children only. It may have been a better option for Peugeot to forego the back seats completely and make an enormous boot, but you can use the back seat area for storage.

Storage generally in the front is minimal — the glove box is small and there’s no other lockable storage.

The driving position is better than some small Peugeots. It’s still not quite set up for a person who is tall, but not as bad as the 206GTI180 I owned. You’re presented with white-faced dials and a satisfying leather steering wheel. Cruise control and stereo controls are situated on the steering wheel and progress can be made along the roads of the nation in relative comfort.

A naturally aspirated 1.6-litre version is available with Porsche’s Tiptronic gearbox and saves you two grand. The turbo comes with a 5-speed manual.

Overall, this is a car with a distinctly feminine image. Its benign handling makes it easy to drive. For the fashion conscious woman the 207CC imparts an air of European sophistication and a serious sunburn if you’re not careful.

Price: from $43,990 (Sport Manual turbo), or $41,990 (naturally aspirated automatic)

What we like

  • Good power for around town, and overtaking
  • Easy to drive (clutch and steering are light)
  • Boot is large when the top isn’t down
  • $5k cheaper than an MX-5

What we don’t like

  • Boot lid seems flimsy
  • Dead pedal spacing designed for small shoes
  • It’s a 3-seater at best unless all passengers are under 5’2″
  • When the rear windows are open the seat belts vibrate

Words and photos Darren Cottingham

207CC  Sport Manual

Engine

1.6 litre, 16 valve, turbo, 4 cylinder petrol engine

Cubic capacity (cc) 1598

Max power kW (HP) @ rpm 110 (150) @ 5800

Max torque (Nm @ rpm) 240 @ 1400

Emission control Catalytic converter

Emission standard E URO 4

Emission of CO2 by weight 171

Wheels and Tyres

Size 205/45 R17, Alloy

Brakes

Front ventilated with sliding callipers

Rear solid discs with sliding callipers

Suspension

Front Independent McPherson type, helical springs and hydraulic dampers, set to operating pressure of 5 bars

Rear Rear Torsion beam, helical springs and hydraulic dampers set to an operating pressure of 5 bars

Dimensions

Length (mm) 4037

Width (mm) with mirrors 1818

Height (mm) 1397

Weights an d Capacities

Kerb weight (kg) 1493

Braked trailer towing weight (kg) 1070

Unbraked trailer towing weight (kg) 600

Fuel Consumption

City Cycle l/100km 9.6

Highway cycle l/100km 5.8

Combined l/100km 7.2

Safety Features

4 star Euro ENCAP rating

4 airbags – driver, passenger and front side airbags

ABS (with EBFD & EBA)

Electronic Stability Program (ESP) (with ASR & CDS)

2 x Rear 3-point seatbelts with pretensioning and load limiting front seatbelts

Load limiting rear seatbelts

Height adjustable front seatbelts and front seatbelt unfastened warning

Isofix on front passenger seat (child safety seat fixing points)

Fuel cut off inertia switch

Active rear rollover bars

Security

Remote central locking

Alarm and deadlocking (optional)

Rolling code transponder immobiliser

Visible VIN number

Security coded in-car entertainment

Lockable glove box

Auto-lock doors/boot over 10 km (selectable)

Comfort and Convenience

Cruise control with speed limiter

Rear park aid (optional)

Internal operated central door locking

One-touch electric windows with anti-pinch front and rear windows

Electrically operated door mirrors & electric folding mirrors

Atmosphere perfumer (optional)

Style sport pack

Radio/CD Player, MP3 compatible

Steering wheel-mounted remote controls

5-Disc CD Changer in centre console (optional) with 6 speakers

Bluetooth (optional)

Digital climate control air conditioning with air conditioned glovebox

Combined active carbon/pollen filter

Leather steering wheel

Front storage bins

Boot net

12V Row 1

Athermic & acoustic windscreen

Auto and directional headlights

Front and rear fog lights & reverse lights

Steel folding roof

Electrochrome rear view mirror

« | »

Let us know what you think

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Road Tests

Silver Sponsors

Car and SUV Team

Richard-Edwards-2016Richard Edwards

Managing editor

linkedinphotoDarren Cottingham

Motoring writer

robertbarry-headRobert Barry

Chief reporter

Ian-Ferguson-6Ian Ferguson

Advertising Consultant

debDeborah Baxter

Operations Manager

RSS Latest News from Autotalk

RSS Latest News from Dieseltalk

Read previous post:
Suzuki Jimny JX 2007 Review

If you had $16,990 to buy a new car you could buy a Kia Picanto manual and have $300 spare,...

Close