Nissan Murano Ti 2007 Review

Nissan Murano Ti 2007 Review

Nissan Murano 2007 fq

A friend of mine is a physiotherapist. We were talking about causes of back and hip pain and he said a big one is people sitting in an unbalanced position while driving. If you put too much weight on one buttock while driving (which many of us apparently do), this can lead to trapped nerves, muscle tightness and a twisted spine, which is all potentially costly in terms of lifestyle and fixing the problems down the track.

What prompted this conversation is Nissan’s Murano Ti. It’s a car that has been on the market for a couple of years, but apart from a brief drive I hadn’t had the chance to do a full road test. The first thing I noticed when I got back in the car was the overwhelming sense that you are sitting on a throne, casting your kingly gaze across the landscape. The seat is very wide and comfortable, and (as a person who has had injury-related back/hip pain), I immediately noticed how straight I was sitting and how comfortable and relaxed I felt in the Murano’s power-adjustable leather heated seats. The cabin has a huge amount of room, especially for the passenger, and plenty of storage — a nice touch is the expandable door pockets. A dashboard the size of a snooker table is sprawled out in front of you — so large, in fact, that you cannot reach the windscreen without sitting on the edge of the seat, seatbelt off.

Two of the seven speakers reside in this vast open wilderness, reflecting sound off the windscreen to give a reasonably good stereo image (a phenomenon also noticeable on Mazda’s CX-7) — the seventh speaker is a subwoofer to enhance the bass.

The steering wheel contains controls for the Bose stereo — a six-disc CD player/radio — and cruise control.

Behind the wheel, three yellow-faced dials give you the essential speed- and fuel-related information. The dashboard also contains a large black LCD with yellow writing that displays other trip computer functions and various vehicle settings. This part of the dashboard juts out leaving an awkward space underneath it that contains a rubber-lined tray.

The gear shifter is perfectly positioned if you would like to use the sequential auto mode to bring out the best in the Murano’s sporty pretensions. The Murano is marketed as a sporty SUV, and endowed with Nissan’s all-aluminiun 3.5-litre 172kW engine and CVT gearbox (similar in power and spec to that of the Maxima Ti), it’s fairly sprightly for its 1800+kg, reaching 100kph in just over eight seconds. The power and torque (318Nm) is delivered in such a smooth and linear way with a muted V6 roar via the four-wheel drive that it is virtually seamless. There is no shortage of grip and I was left wondering how often the VDC (traction and stability control) would need to cut in given the wide tyres and four-wheel drive. ABS, electronic brakeforce distribution and brake assist complete the driving aids.

The Murano received a 5-star NHTSA safety rating and as well as seat belt pretensioners and active headrests it has driver and passenger front and side airbags, and curtain airbags.

Moving to the outside, Nissan unfortunately supplied the worst colour possible for a press car. It looks so much better in black. Nestled between the high intensity discharge xenon bulb headlights, the Murano’s ‘architectural’ grille isn’t the prettiest; it looks much better from the back with its dual exhausts.

It is a large car with 225/65R18 tyres and 18-inch wheels attempting to fill the arches. The rear window line swoops up to meet the roof almost in a teardrop shape — perhaps a nod to the name Murano, which comes from the elegantly sculpted glass art from the islands near venice. This is a nice styling cue, but doesn’t help at all with reversing, and our car wasn’t fitted with optional reversing sensors.

Our test car, the Ti, gets heated, power-operated leather front seats, electric sunroof and roof rails over the lesser-specced ST.

Practically everything is right about the Murano — it has a huge boot, plenty of power, it’s comfortable to ride in, it looks OK (but not in the colour we got), and it comes with the safety packages we expect. And I found it good for my lower back — perhaps the Murano is more ‘hip’ than I first thought.

Price: from $59,950 (Ti, as tested),  $54,950 (ST)

What we like

  • Smooth power
  • Supremely comfortable
  • Large and flexible loading space

What we don’t like

  • Reversing (you’ll kick yourself if you don’t get the optional Rear Park Assist)
  • In-dash screen and controls feel a bit dated

Words and photos Darren Cottingham

Nissan Murano 2007 fq

A friend of mine is a physiotherapist. We were talking about causes of back and hip pain and he said a big one is people sitting in an unbalanced position while driving. If you put too much weight on one buttock while driving (which many of us apparently do), this can lead to trapped nerves, muscle tightness and a twisted spine, which is all potentially costly in terms of lifestyle and fixing the problems down the track.

What prompted this conversation is Nissan’s Murano Ti. It’s a car that has been on the market for a couple of years, but apart from a brief drive I hadn’t had the chance to do a full road test. The first thing I noticed when I got back in the car was the overwhelming sense that you are sitting on a throne, casting your kingly gaze across the landscape. The seat is very wide and comfortable, and (as a person who has had injury-related back/hip pain), I immediately noticed how straight I was sitting and how comfortable and relaxed I felt in the Murano’s power-adjustable leather heated seats. The cabin has a huge amount of room, especially for the passenger, and plenty of storage — a nice touch is the expandable door pockets. A dashboard the size of a snooker table is sprawled out in front of you — so large, in fact, that you cannot reach the windscreen without sitting on the edge of the seat, seatbelt off.

Two of the seven speakers reside in this vast open wilderness, reflecting sound off the windscreen to give a reasonably good stereo image (a phenomenon also noticeable on Mazda’s CX-7) — the seventh speaker is a subwoofer to enhance the bass.

The steering wheel contains controls for the Bose stereo — a six-disc CD player/radio — and cruise control.

Behind the wheel, three yellow-faced dials give you the essential speed- and fuel-related information. The dashboard also contains a large black LCD with yellow writing that displays other trip computer functions and various vehicle settings. This part of the dashboard juts out leaving an awkward space underneath it that contains a rubber-lined tray.

The gear shifter is perfectly positioned if you would like to use the sequential auto mode to bring out the best in the Murano’s sporty pretensions. The Murano is marketed as a sporty SUV, and endowed with Nissan’s all-aluminiun 3.5-litre 172kW engine and CVT gearbox (similar in power and spec to that of the Maxima Ti), it’s fairly sprightly for its 1800+kg, reaching 100kph in just over eight seconds. The power and torque (318Nm) is delivered in such a smooth and linear way with a muted V6 roar via the four-wheel drive that it is virtually seamless. There is no shortage of grip and I was left wondering how often the VDC (traction and stability control) would need to cut in given the wide tyres and four-wheel drive. ABS, electronic brakeforce distribution and brake assist complete the driving aids.

The Murano received a 5-star NHTSA safety rating and as well as seat belt pretensioners and active headrests it has driver and passenger front and side airbags, and curtain airbags.

Moving to the outside, Nissan unfortunately supplied the worst colour possible for a press car. It looks so much better in black. Nestled between the high intensity discharge xenon bulb headlights, the Murano’s ‘architectural’ grille isn’t the prettiest; it looks much better from the back with its dual exhausts.

It is a large car with 225/65R18 tyres and 18-inch wheels attempting to fill the arches. The rear window line swoops up to meet the roof almost in a teardrop shape — perhaps a nod to the name Murano, which comes from the elegantly sculpted glass art from the islands near venice. This is a nice styling cue, but doesn’t help at all with reversing, and our car wasn’t fitted with optional reversing sensors.

Our test car, the Ti, gets heated, power-operated leather front seats, electric sunroof and roof rails over the lesser-specced ST.

Practically everything is right about the Murano — it has a huge boot, plenty of power, it’s comfortable to ride in, it looks OK (but not in the colour we got), and it comes with the safety packages we expect. And I found it good for my lower back — perhaps the Murano is more ‘hip’ than I first thought.

Price: from $59,950 (Ti, as tested),  $54,950 (ST)

What we like

  • Smooth power
  • Supremely comfortable
  • Large and flexible loading space

What we don’t like

  • Reversing (you’ll kick yourself if you don’t get the optional Rear Park Assist)
  • In-dash screen and controls feel a bit dated

Words and photos Darren Cottingham

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