Ford Territory Turbo Ghia AWD 2007 Review

Ford Territory Turbo Ghia AWD 2007 Review

Ford Territory Turbo Ghia 2007 fq

The Territory Turbo Ghia, while large isn’t overly domineering to other road users. It has a bonnet nostril feeding air into the intercooler (the only major difference from the non-turbo versions) and is extremely well proportioned, sitting almost expectantly ready to launch forwards.

Packing the same 245kW engine out of the Falcon XR6 Turbo, Ford’s Territory Turbo Ghia holsters a 4-litre inline-6 with forced induction. There’s a hint of Bell Jet Ranger as the turbo spools up and then all four wheels grapple with the equation of 480Nm of torque, tarmac plus large mass of steel and cow hide. Surging forwards like it’s been jabbed with a cattle prod, the instantaneous fuel consumption figures on the trip computer start to look scary. You know that when the gauge stops at 99.9 litres per 100km, that it’s actually more than that. Still, that’s no worse than many other large cars when asked to win the traffic light grand prix.

So, to see how economical I could be I planned a trip from Takapuna to Whangaparaoa where, to be as frugal as possible, I would use the cruise control when practical. The Territory’s cruise control is better than many — it doesn’t search for the speed, and it even keeps the right speed going downhill. The problem when using cruise control is you become painfully aware of how woeful many people are at maintaining a constant speed, especially when they get to a hill. I notice if my speed drops from 100 down to 80; some people evidently don’t. Anyway, a quick prod on the accelerator, the atmosphere is gulped in courtesy of the turbo, and you’re by them.

There’s another reason for this trip. The Territory is a seven-seater, and I’m not contraceptively challenged, therefore I need to borrow a child — one is fine; I can’t cope with any more. Fortunately this is where step-brothers come in handy: one step brother to be precise. He’s 11 (well, 11 and a half because that extra half matters), and intensely annoying. The acid test for the Territory is if he shuts up in the back without me having to use chloroform and gaffer tape.

There’s some instant credibility with the reversing camera, which shows on the screen in the central console. The camera has a fisheye lens and can see a 130-degree view and up to 15 metres behind you. He’s impressed with how comfortable the leather seats are, that there are cup holders in the back and storage compartments galore (30 of them), and that when I stamped on the accelerator his youthful neck muscles were given a workout.

We set off for a jaunt around Orewa. It’s 5:30pm. He started feeling drowsy. No, it wasn’t the exciting adult conversation lulling him to sleep. It’s revealed that when he stayed over at his friend’s the night before they were up until 2am growing puppy fat courtesy of the PlayStation.

But it didn’t really matter because 11-year-old passengers don’t buy cars, and I was mostly already convinced of the Territory’s effectiveness in transporting large numbers of people. We have the lower specification Territory TX AWD in our office in which we’ve taken six adults from Auckland to Beach Hop (Whangamata), then across to Super Lap (Taupo) including luggage, and it was fine, if a bit cramped for poor Fred who had the rear seats to himself. And the Turbo Ghia really is a huge step up from that in terms of comfort and driving dynamics.

Instantaneous fuel usage heart attacks aside, the Territory Turbo Ghia used 13.2 litres per 100km average on my trip. On the flat, cruising at 90, it’s very economical, it’s just when you want to accelerate at all that the best part of 2.2 tonnes empties the tank like a step-brother with a Coke — we managed 16.7 for the rest of our time with the Territory.

So, if I had five kids to transport and $72,990 burning a hole in my pocket would I buy the Territory, or would I sell two of the kids and get something else? I like the Territory. I’m not a kids person, but it’s packed full of convenient features. It’s a car that’s immediately easy to drive — it’s comfortable, powerful, looks good and is very practical.

Looking for a Ford Territory Turbo in New Zealand? Check this site out (opens in a new window)

WHAT WE LIKE:

  • Comfort
  • Power
  • Features
  • Interior well thought out
  • Practicality

WHAT WE DON’T LIKE:

  • Needs a sports suspension mode to match the power
  • Thirsty
  • Road noise on rough surfaces
  • Like all Fords, the stereo is adequate but not stellar

Words and photos Darren Cottingham

Ford Territory Turbo Ghia 2007 fq

The Territory Turbo Ghia, while large isn’t overly domineering to other road users. It has a bonnet nostril feeding air into the intercooler (the only major difference from the non-turbo versions) and is extremely well proportioned, sitting almost expectantly ready to launch forwards.

Packing the same 245kW engine out of the Falcon XR6 Turbo, Ford’s Territory Turbo Ghia holsters a 4-litre inline-6 with forced induction. There’s a hint of Bell Jet Ranger as the turbo spools up and then all four wheels grapple with the equation of 480Nm of torque, tarmac plus large mass of steel and cow hide. Surging forwards like it’s been jabbed with a cattle prod, the instantaneous fuel consumption figures on the trip computer start to look scary. You know that when the gauge stops at 99.9 litres per 100km, that it’s actually more than that. Still, that’s no worse than many other large cars when asked to win the traffic light grand prix.

So, to see how economical I could be I planned a trip from Takapuna to Whangaparaoa where, to be as frugal as possible, I would use the cruise control when practical. The Territory’s cruise control is better than many — it doesn’t search for the speed, and it even keeps the right speed going downhill. The problem when using cruise control is you become painfully aware of how woeful many people are at maintaining a constant speed, especially when they get to a hill. I notice if my speed drops from 100 down to 80; some people evidently don’t. Anyway, a quick prod on the accelerator, the atmosphere is gulped in courtesy of the turbo, and you’re by them.

There’s another reason for this trip. The Territory is a seven-seater, and I’m not contraceptively challenged, therefore I need to borrow a child — one is fine; I can’t cope with any more. Fortunately this is where step-brothers come in handy: one step brother to be precise. He’s 11 (well, 11 and a half because that extra half matters), and intensely annoying. The acid test for the Territory is if he shuts up in the back without me having to use chloroform and gaffer tape.

There’s some instant credibility with the reversing camera, which shows on the screen in the central console. The camera has a fisheye lens and can see a 130-degree view and up to 15 metres behind you. He’s impressed with how comfortable the leather seats are, that there are cup holders in the back and storage compartments galore (30 of them), and that when I stamped on the accelerator his youthful neck muscles were given a workout.

We set off for a jaunt around Orewa. It’s 5:30pm. He started feeling drowsy. No, it wasn’t the exciting adult conversation lulling him to sleep. It’s revealed that when he stayed over at his friend’s the night before they were up until 2am growing puppy fat courtesy of the PlayStation.

But it didn’t really matter because 11-year-old passengers don’t buy cars, and I was mostly already convinced of the Territory’s effectiveness in transporting large numbers of people. We have the lower specification Territory TX AWD in our office in which we’ve taken six adults from Auckland to Beach Hop (Whangamata), then across to Super Lap (Taupo) including luggage, and it was fine, if a bit cramped for poor Fred who had the rear seats to himself. And the Turbo Ghia really is a huge step up from that in terms of comfort and driving dynamics.

Instantaneous fuel usage heart attacks aside, the Territory Turbo Ghia used 13.2 litres per 100km average on my trip. On the flat, cruising at 90, it’s very economical, it’s just when you want to accelerate at all that the best part of 2.2 tonnes empties the tank like a step-brother with a Coke — we managed 16.7 for the rest of our time with the Territory.

So, if I had five kids to transport and $72,990 burning a hole in my pocket would I buy the Territory, or would I sell two of the kids and get something else? I like the Territory. I’m not a kids person, but it’s packed full of convenient features. It’s a car that’s immediately easy to drive — it’s comfortable, powerful, looks good and is very practical.

Looking for a Ford Territory Turbo in New Zealand? Check this site out (opens in a new window)

WHAT WE LIKE:

  • Comfort
  • Power
  • Features
  • Interior well thought out
  • Practicality

WHAT WE DON’T LIKE:

  • Needs a sports suspension mode to match the power
  • Thirsty
  • Road noise on rough surfaces
  • Like all Fords, the stereo is adequate but not stellar

Words and photos Darren Cottingham

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Ford Territory XR Turbo AWD 2007 Review

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